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Degradation of sexual reproduction in Veronica filiformis after introduction to Europe

Scalone, Romain and Albach, Dirk C. (2012). Degradation of sexual reproduction in Veronica filiformis after introduction to Europe. BMC evolutionary biology. 12, 1-19
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Official URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1471-2148-12-233

Abstract

BACKGROUND
Baker’s law predicts that self-incompatible plant species are generally poor colonizers because their mating system requires a high diversity of genetically differentiated individuals and thus self-compatibility should develop after long-distance dispersal. However, cases like the introduction of the self-incompatible Veronica filiformis (Plantaginaceae) to Europe constitute an often overlooked alternative to this rule. This species was introduced from subalpine areas of the Pontic-Caucasian Mountains and colonized many parts of Central and Western Europe in the last century, apparently without producing seeds. To investigate the consequences of the absence of sexual reproduction in this obligate outcrosser since its introduction, AFLP fingerprints, flower morphology, pollen and ovule production and seed vitality were studied in introduced and native populations.
 
RESULTS
Interpopulation crossings of 19 introduced German populations performed in the greenhouse demonstrated that introduced populations are often unable to reproduce sexually. These results were similar to intrapopulation crossings, but this depended on the populations used for crossings. Results from AFLP fingerprinting confirmed a lack of genetic diversity in the area of introduction, which is best explained by the dispersal of clones. Flower morphology revealed the frequent presence of mutations affecting the androecium of the flower and decreasing pollen production in introduced populations. The seeds produced in our experiments were smaller, had a lower germination rate and had lower viability than seeds from the native area.
 
CONCLUSIONS
Taken together, our results demonstrate that V. filiformis was able to spread by vegetative means in the absence of sexual reproduction. This came at the cost of an accumulation of phenotypically observable mutations in reproductive characters, i.e. Muller’s ratchet.

Authors/Creators:Scalone, Romain and Albach, Dirk C.
Title:Degradation of sexual reproduction in Veronica filiformis after introduction to Europe
Series/Journal:BMC evolutionary biology (1471-2148)
Year of publishing :2012
Volume:12
Page range:1-19
Number of Pages:19
Publisher:BioMed Central
ISSN:1471-2148
Language:English
Publication Type:Journal article
Refereed:Yes
Article category:Scientific peer reviewed
Version:Published version
Full Text Status:Public
Agris subject categories.:F Plant production > F40 Plant ecology
Subjects:(A) Swedish standard research categories 2011 > 1 Natural sciences > 106 Biological Sciences (Medical to be 3 and Agricultural to be 4) > Evolutionary Biology
(A) Swedish standard research categories 2011 > 1 Natural sciences > 106 Biological Sciences (Medical to be 3 and Agricultural to be 4) > Botany
(A) Swedish standard research categories 2011 > 1 Natural sciences > 106 Biological Sciences (Medical to be 3 and Agricultural to be 4) > Ecology
(A) Swedish standard research categories 2011 > 1 Natural sciences > 106 Biological Sciences (Medical to be 3 and Agricultural to be 4) > Genetics (medical genetics to be 30107 and agricultural genetics to be 40402)
Keywords:Self-incompatible plant species, Veronica filiformis, Plant reproduction, Evolutionary biology
URN:NBN:urn:nbn:se:slu:epsilon-e-1511
Permanent URL:
http://urn.kb.se/resolve?urn=urn:nbn:se:slu:epsilon-e-1511
Additional ID:
Type of IDID
Web of Science (WoS)000313284800001
DOI10.1186/1471-2148-12-233
ID Code:10525
Department:(NL, NJ) > Dept. of Crop Production Ecology
Deposited By: SLUpub Connector
Deposited On:19 Jun 2013 10:10
Metadata Last Modified:24 Jan 2015 01:50

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