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Colonisation of ephemeral forest habitats by specialised species: beetles and bugs associated with recently dead aspen wood

Ranius, Thomas and Martikainen, Petri and Kouki, Jari (2011). Colonisation of ephemeral forest habitats by specialised species: beetles and bugs associated with recently dead aspen wood. Biodiversity and conservation. 20:13, 2903-2915
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Official URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10531-011-0124-y

Abstract

The most appropriate strategy for preserving fragmented populations depends on a species’ ability to colonise distant habitat patches. Insects associated with early decay stages of dead wood are expected to have a high capacity to colonise new habitat patches. To study the dispersal ranges of beetles (Coleoptera) and flat bugs (Hemiptera: Aradidae) dependent on recently dead aspen (Populus tremula) wood in Finland, we set out 58 piles of recently cut aspen logs at various distances up to 1.6 km from forests that contained a high density of old aspen trees. We captured insects by trunk window-traps, and counted beetles’ exit holes. Habitat connectivity was measured in terms of the amount of suitable aspen-wood in the surrounding environment, with the closest dead wood items up-weighted by a negative-exponential function.
The log-piles attracted many saproxylic insects including four red-listed aspen-specialist species. The exposure of log-piles to the sun, and high levels of habitat connectivity increased the species richness of aspen-specialists, whereas bark peeling by moose decreased richness. The spatial scale at which species richness had its strongest response to habitat was 93 m. Among individual species there was a wide variability in spatial scale of response.
This study supports the view that conservation efforts in boreal forests should be concentrated on sites where colonisation by target species is most likely. Restoration of habitat by re-locating logs may be useful at localities with a rich and specialised fauna but which have too low rate of formation of dead wood by natural processes.

Authors/Creators:Ranius, Thomas and Martikainen, Petri and Kouki, Jari
Title:Colonisation of ephemeral forest habitats by specialised species: beetles and bugs associated with recently dead aspen wood
Series/Journal:Biodiversity and conservation (0960-3115)
Year of publishing :2011
Volume:20
Number:13
Page range:2903-2915
Publisher:Springer
ISSN:0960-3115
Language:English
Publication Type:Journal article
Refereed:Yes
Article category:Scientific peer reviewed
Version:Accepted version
Full Text Status:Public
Agris subject categories.:F Plant production > F40 Plant ecology
K Forestry > K01 Forestry - General aspects
Subjects:(A) Swedish standard research categories 2011 > 1 Natural sciences > 106 Biological Sciences (Medical to be 3 and Agricultural to be 4) > Ecology
Agrovoc terms:Bark, Habitats, Insects
Keywords:bark, dispersal , habitat connectivity, restoration, saproxylic insects
URN:NBN:urn:nbn:se:slu:epsilon-e-1798
Permanent URL:
http://urn.kb.se/resolve?urn=urn:nbn:se:slu:epsilon-e-1798
ID Code:11010
Faculty:NL - Faculty of Natural Resources and Agricultural Sciences (until 2013)
Department:(NL, NJ) > Dept. of Ecology
(S) > Dept. of Ecology
External funders:FORMAS
Deposited By: Thomas Ranius
Deposited On:03 Mar 2014 15:37
Metadata Last Modified:02 Dec 2014 11:04

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