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Long-term fertilization of a boreal Norway spruce forest increases the temperature sensitivity of soil organic carbon mineralization

Strömgren, Monika and Coucheney, Elsa and Lerch, Thomas and Herrmann, Anke (2013). Long-term fertilization of a boreal Norway spruce forest increases the temperature sensitivity of soil organic carbon mineralization. Ecology and evolution. 3:16, 5177-5188
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Official URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ece3.895

Abstract

Boreal ecosystems store one-third of global soil organic carbon (SOC) and are particularly sensitive to climate warming and higher nutrient inputs. Thus, a better description of how forest managements such as nutrient fertilization impact soil carbon (C) and its temperature sensitivity is needed to better predict feedbacks between C cycling and climate. The temperature sensitivity of in
situ soil C respiration was investigated in a boreal forest, which has received long-term nutrient fertilization (22 years), and compared with the temperature sensitivity of C mineralization measured in the laboratory. We found that the fertilization treatment increased both the response of soil in situ CO2 effluxes
to a warming treatment and the temperature sensitivity of C mineralization measured in the laboratory (Q10). These results suggested that soil C may be more sensitive to an increase in temperature in long-term fertilized in comparison with nutrient poor boreal ecosystems. Furthermore, the fertilization treatment modified the SOC content and the microbial community composition, but we found no direct relationship between either SOC or microbial changes and the temperature sensitivity of C mineralization. However, the relation between the soil C:N ratio and the fungal/bacterial ratio was changed in the combined warmed and fertilized treatment compared with the other treatments, which suggest that strong interaction mechanisms may occur between nutrient input and warming in boreal soils. Further research is needed to unravel into more details in how far soil organic matter and microbial community composition changes are responsible for the change in the temperature sensitivity of soil C under increasing mineral N inputs. Such research would help to take into account the effect of fertilization managements on soil C storage in C cycling
numerical models.

Authors/Creators:Strömgren, Monika and Coucheney, Elsa and Lerch, Thomas and Herrmann, Anke
Title:Long-term fertilization of a boreal Norway spruce forest increases the temperature sensitivity of soil organic carbon mineralization
Series/Journal:Ecology and evolution (2045-7758)
Year of publishing :2013
Volume:3
Number:16
Page range:5177-5188
Number of Pages:12
Publisher:John Wiley & Sons
ISSN:2045-7758
Language:English
Publication Type:Journal article
Refereed:Yes
Article category:Scientific peer reviewed
Version:Published version
Full Text Status:Public
Agris subject categories.:P Natural resources > P30 Soil science and management
Subjects:(A) Swedish standard research categories 2011 > 1 Natural sciences > 105 Earth and Related Environmental Sciences > Environmental Sciences (social aspects to be 507)
Agrovoc terms:microbial ecology, nutrients, fertilization, carbon, soil, temperature resistance
Keywords:boreal soils, microbial community, nutrient fertilization, soil organic carbon, temperature sensitivity, warming
URN:NBN:urn:nbn:se:slu:epsilon-e-2034
Permanent URL:
http://urn.kb.se/resolve?urn=urn:nbn:se:slu:epsilon-e-2034
Additional ID:
Type of IDID
Web of Science (WoS)000328672600005
DOI10.1002/ece3.895
ID Code:11298
Faculty:NL - Faculty of Natural Resources and Agricultural Sciences (until 2013)
Department:(NL, NJ) > Dept. of Soil and Environment
(S) > Dept. of Soil and Environment

(NL, NJ) > Dept. of Chemistry (until 131231)
Deposited By: SLUpub Connector
Deposited On:09 Oct 2015 09:09
Metadata Last Modified:10 Oct 2015 13:51

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