Home About Browse Search
Svenska


Home-based malaria management in children by women: Evidence from a malaria endemic community in sub-Saharan Africa

Eugene-Ezebilo, Doreen N. and Ezebilo, Eugene Ejike (2015). Home-based malaria management in children by women: Evidence from a malaria endemic community in sub-Saharan Africa. Asian Pacific Journal of Tropical Disease. 5:7, 532-538
[Journal article]

[img]
Preview
PDF - Accepted Version
Available under License Creative Commons Attribution Non-commercial No Derivatives.

328kB

Abstract

Objective: To examine the medicines and dosage that mothers who engage in home-based malaria management administer to children aged ≤ 5 years having signs and symptoms associated with malaria and to discuss the possibilities of designing an effective home-based malaria management strategy.

Methods: The data were obtained from face-to-face semi-structured interviews conducted with mothers in the Ugbowo Community of Benin City, Nigeria who were selected using multi-stage systematic random sampling technique. The data were analyzed by qualitative content analysis, arithmetic mean, simple percentages and bar chart.

Results: Approximately 90% of the interviewees engaged in home-based malaria management and 10% patronized the hospital. Most of the interviewees who engaged in home-based malaria management administered medicines that stimulates the production of red blood cells and supplies vitamins to children having signs and symptoms of malaria, followed by painkillers and anti-malaria and cough medicine was the least. Of the anti-malaria medicines administered to children, almost 80% of the interviewees administered chloroquine to children, 15% quinine and 3% halfan. Approximately 60% of the interviewees had the correct knowledge of the dosage regime for chloroquine, 38% for quinine and 9% for halfan.

Conclusions: Although home-based malaria management is important, it cannot serve as a substitute to the hospital. Some diseases have signs and symptoms that are similar to that of malaria which implies that administering anti-malaria medicines to a child without confirmatory tests might lead to irredeemable complications in that child. If the strategy is to make home-based malaria management effective and sustainable mothers, community health officials should be involved in designing the strategy. Simple rapid diagnostic test kits for malaria should be made available to community health officials and pharmacists so that confirmatory tests could be carried out before dispensing medicines.

Authors/Creators:Eugene-Ezebilo, Doreen N. and Ezebilo, Eugene Ejike
Title:Home-based malaria management in children by women: Evidence from a malaria endemic community in sub-Saharan Africa
Series/Journal:Asian Pacific Journal of Tropical Disease (BIB14748313)
Year of publishing :2015
Volume:5
Number:7
Page range:532-538
Number of Pages:7
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:2222-1808
Language:English
Publication Type:Journal article
Refereed:Yes
Article category:Scientific peer reviewed
Version:Accepted version
Full Text Status:Public
Subjects:(A) Swedish standard research categories 2011 > 3 Medical and Health Sciences > 303 Health Sciences > Health Care Service and Management, Health Policy and Services and Health Economy
(A) Swedish standard research categories 2011 > 3 Medical and Health Sciences > 303 Health Sciences > Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Agrovoc terms:malaria, disease prevention
Keywords:Anti-malaria medicines, indigenous knowledge, malaria management, mothers, paediatrics
URN:NBN:urn:nbn:se:slu:epsilon-e-3456
Permanent URL:
http://urn.kb.se/resolve?urn=urn:nbn:se:slu:epsilon-e-3456
Additional ID:
Type of IDID
DOI10.1016/S2222-1808(15)60831-3
ID Code:13296
Faculty:S - Faculty of Forest Sciences
Department:(S) > Southern Swedish Forest Research Centre
Deposited By: SLUpub Connector
Deposited On:26 May 2016 09:03
Metadata Last Modified:13 Jun 2016 23:15

Repository Staff Only: item control page

Downloads

Downloads per year (since September 2012)

View more statistics

Downloads
Hits