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The importance of benthic-pelagic coupling for marine ecosystem functioning in a changing world

Griffiths, Jennifer R. and Kadin, Martina and Niiranen, Susa and Nascimento, Francisco and Tamelander, Tobias and Törnroos, Anna and Bonaglia, Stefano and Bonsdorf, Erik and Gårdmark, Anna and Brüchert, Volker and Järnström, Marie and Kotta, Jonne and Lindegren, Martin and Norström, Marie and Norkko, Alf and Olsson, Jens and Weigel, Benjamin and Zydelis, Ramunas and Blenckner, Thorsten and Niiranen, Susa and Winder, Monica (2017). The importance of benthic-pelagic coupling for marine ecosystem functioning in a changing world. Global change biology. 23:6, 2179-2196
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Official URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/gcb.13642

Abstract

Benthic-pelagic coupling is manifested as the exchange of energy, mass, or nutrients between benthic and pelagic habitats. It plays a prominent role in aquatic ecosystems, and it is crucial to functions from nutrient cycling to energy transfer in food webs. Coastal and estuarine ecosystem structure and function are strongly affected by anthropogenic pressures; however, there are large gaps in our understanding of the responses of inorganic nutrient and organic matter fluxes between benthic habitats and the water column. We illustrate the varied nature of physical and biological benthic-pelagic coupling processes and their potential sensitivity to three anthropogenic pressures - climate change, nutrient loading, and fishing - using the Baltic Sea as a case study and summarize current knowledge on the exchange of inorganic nutrients and organic material between habitats. Traditionally measured benthic-pelagic coupling processes (e.g., nutrient exchange and sedimentation of organic material) are to some extent quantifiable, but the magnitude and variability of biological processes are rarely assessed, preventing quantitative comparisons. Changing oxygen conditions will continue to have widespread effects on the processes that govern inorganic and organic matter exchange among habitats while climate change and nutrient load reductions may have large effects on organic matter sedimentation. Many biological processes (predation, bioturbation) are expected to be sensitive to anthropogenic drivers, but the outcomes for ecosystem function are largely unknown. We emphasize how improved empirical and experimental understanding of benthic-pelagic coupling processes and their variability are necessary to inform models that can quantify the feedbacks among processes and ecosystem responses to a changing world.

Authors/Creators:Griffiths, Jennifer R. and Kadin, Martina and Niiranen, Susa and Nascimento, Francisco and Tamelander, Tobias and Törnroos, Anna and Bonaglia, Stefano and Bonsdorf, Erik and Gårdmark, Anna and Brüchert, Volker and Järnström, Marie and Kotta, Jonne and Lindegren, Martin and Norström, Marie and Norkko, Alf and Olsson, Jens and Weigel, Benjamin and Zydelis, Ramunas and Blenckner, Thorsten and Niiranen, Susa and Winder, Monica
Title:The importance of benthic-pelagic coupling for marine ecosystem functioning in a changing world
Series/Journal:Global change biology (1365-2486)
Year of publishing :2017
Volume:23
Number:6
Page range:2179-2196
Number of Pages:18
Publisher:John Wiley & Sons Ltd.
Associated Programs and Other Stakeholders:SLU - Environmental assessment > Programme Coastal and sea areas
ISSN:1365-2486
Language:English
Publication Type:Article Review/Survey
Refereed:Yes
Article category:Scientific peer reviewed
Version:Published version
Full Text Status:Public
Agris subject categories.:M Aquatic sciences and fisheries > M40 Aquatic ecology
Subjects:(A) Swedish standard research categories 2011 > 1 Natural sciences > 105 Earth and Related Environmental Sciences > Oceanography, Hydrology, Water Resources
Keywords:benthic, climate change, ecosystem dynamics, ecosystem function, fishing, nutrient loading, pelagic
URN:NBN:urn:nbn:se:slu:epsilon-e-4180
Permanent URL:
http://urn.kb.se/resolve?urn=urn:nbn:se:slu:epsilon-e-4180
Additional ID:
Type of IDID
Web of Science (WoS)000400445900005
ID Code:14340
Faculty:NJ - Fakulteten för naturresurser och jordbruksvetenskap
Department:(NL, NJ) > Department of Aquatic Resources
Deposited By: SLUpub Connector
Deposited On:23 May 2017 13:26
Metadata Last Modified:23 May 2017 13:26

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