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Grass Pollen Affects Survival and Development of Larval Anopheles arabiensis (Diptera: Culicidae)

Asmare, Yelfwagash and Hopkins, Richard and Tekie, Habte and Hill, Sharon and Ignell, Rickard (2017). Grass Pollen Affects Survival and Development of Larval Anopheles arabiensis (Diptera: Culicidae). Journal of Insect Science. 17, 1-8
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Official URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/jisesa/iex067

Abstract

Nutrients in breeding sites are critical for the survival and development of malaria mosquitoes, having a direct impact on vectorial capacity. Yet, there is a limited understanding about the natural larval diet and its impact on the individual fitness of mosquitoes. Recent studies have shown that gravid Anopheles arabiensis Patton (Diptera: Culicidae) are attracted by and oviposit in grass-associated habitats. The pollen provided by these grasses is a potential source of nutrients for the larvae. Here, we assess the effect of Typha latifolia L. (Poales: Typhaceae), Echinochloa pyramidalis Lamarck, Pennisetum setaceum Forssk dagger l, and Zea mays L. pollen on larval survival and rate of development in An. arabiensis under laboratory conditions. In addition, we characterize the carbon to nitrogen ratio and the size of pollen grains as a measure of diet quality. Carbon-rich pollen with a small grain size (T. latifolia and P. setaceum; 9.7 +/- 0.3 x 10(3) and 5.5 +/- 0.2 x 10(4) mu m(3), respectively) resulted in enhanced rates of development of An. arabiensis. In contrast, the larva fed on the nitrogen-rich control diet (TetraMin) was slower to develop, but demonstrated the highest larval survival. Larvae fed on carbon-rich and large-grained Z. mays pollen (4.1 +/- 0.2 x 10(5) mu m(3)) survived at similar levels as those fed on the control diet and also took a longer time to develop compared with larvae fed on the other pollens. While males and females did not appear to develop differently on the different pollen diets, males consistently emerged faster than their female counterparts. These results are discussed in relation to integrated vector management.

Authors/Creators:Asmare, Yelfwagash and Hopkins, Richard and Tekie, Habte and Hill, Sharon and Ignell, Rickard
Title:Grass Pollen Affects Survival and Development of Larval Anopheles arabiensis (Diptera: Culicidae)
Series/Journal:Journal of Insect Science (1536-2442)
Year of publishing :2017
Volume:17
Page range:1-8
Number of Pages:8
Publisher:Entomological Society of America, Oxford University Press
ISSN:1536-2442
Language:English
Publication Type:Journal article
Refereed:Yes
Article category:Scientific peer reviewed
Version:Published version
Full Text Status:Public
Subjects:(A) Swedish standard research categories 2011 > 1 Natural sciences > 106 Biological Sciences (Medical to be 3 and Agricultural to be 4) > Ecology
(A) Swedish standard research categories 2011 > 1 Natural sciences > 106 Biological Sciences (Medical to be 3 and Agricultural to be 4) > Zoology
Agrovoc terms:Culicidae, pollen, nutrients, malaria
Keywords:Carbon to nitrogen ratio, pollen grain, nutrient, mosquito, malaria
URN:NBN:urn:nbn:se:slu:epsilon-e-4611
Permanent URL:
http://urn.kb.se/resolve?urn=urn:nbn:se:slu:epsilon-e-4611
Additional ID:
Type of IDID
DOI10.1093/jisesa/iex067
Web of Science (WoS)000414421000002
ID Code:14980
Faculty:LTV - Fakulteten för landskapsarkitektur, trädgårds- och växtproduktionsvetenskap
Department:(LTJ, LTV) > Department of Plant Protection Biology
Deposited By: SLUpub Connector
Deposited On:11 Jan 2018 10:31
Metadata Last Modified:11 Jan 2018 10:31

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