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Perceived adaptive capacity within a multi-level governance setting: The role of bonding, bridging, and linking social capital

Dressel, Sabrina and Johansson, Maria and Ericsson, Göran and Sandstrom, Camilla (2020). Perceived adaptive capacity within a multi-level governance setting: The role of bonding, bridging, and linking social capital. Environmental Science and Policy. 104 , 88-97
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Abstract

In 2012 Sweden implemented a collaborative governance regime for managing moose (Alces aloes). This was guided by the awareness that decentralization and stakeholder participation can help to reduce conflicts, foster systematic learning, and handle complexity. However, previous research has highlighted that there are no blueprint approaches to the governance and management of natural resources. In this case, diverse multi-use landscapes, ever-changing ungulate populations, and other external stressors (e.g. climate change, wildlife diseases) can create challenges for collaborative institutions. Adaptive capacity is therefore needed as it allows a system and the actors involved to react successfully to social-ecological changes and to develop even in times of no imminent change or risk. Using Swedish moose management as an example of a multi-level governance system, this research assesses the critical determinants of adaptive capacity across levels. We developed and applied a psychometric approach to measure actors' perceived adaptive capacity on two levels in the management system. A web-based survey was sent to Moose Management Groups (n = 765, response rate = 81 %) and Moose Management Units (n = 1,380, response rate = 71 %). Using structural equation modelling, we assessed the relative importance of governance aspects, different types of social capital, as well as human and financial capital on actors' perceived adaptive capacity. Linking and bridging social capital in the system had significant impacts on both levels. Actors felt more prepared to handle future challenges in moose management when they perceived benefits through collaborations with levels below and expressed social trust in authorities and the management level above. Besides those similarities between the two levels, fairness was a more important determinant of actors' perceived adaptive capacity on the lower management level. These results can contribute to a future improvement of the collaborative governance setting by finessing strategic interventions on different levels. Furthermore, our results illustrate the importance of scale when assessing the adaptive capacity of a system.

Authors/Creators:Dressel, Sabrina and Johansson, Maria and Ericsson, Göran and Sandstrom, Camilla
Title:Perceived adaptive capacity within a multi-level governance setting: The role of bonding, bridging, and linking social capital
Year of publishing :2020
Volume:104
Page range:88-97
Number of Pages:10
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:1462-9011
Language:English
Publication Type:Journal article
Article category:Scientific peer reviewed
Version:Published version
Copyright:Creative Commons: Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0
Full Text Status:Public
Subjects:(A) Swedish standard research categories 2011 > 4 Agricultural Sciences > 405 Other Agricultural Sciences > Fish and Wildlife Management
(A) Swedish standard research categories 2011 > 5 Social Sciences > 501 Psychology > Applied Psychology
Keywords:Adaptive capacity, Multi-level governance, Social capital, Social trust, Social-ecological system, Social learning
URN:NBN:urn:nbn:se:slu:epsilon-p-104690
Permanent URL:
http://urn.kb.se/resolve?urn=urn:nbn:se:slu:epsilon-p-104690
Additional ID:
Type of IDID
DOI10.1016/j.envsci.2019.11.011
Web of Science (WoS)000513291300011
ID Code:16742
Faculty:S - Faculty of Forest Sciences
Department:(S) > Dept. of Wildlife, Fish and Environmental Studies
Deposited By: SLUpub Connector
Deposited On:14 Apr 2020 11:43
Metadata Last Modified:14 Apr 2020 11:43

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