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Effects and effectiveness of lethal shark hazard management: The Shark Meshing (Bather Protection) Program, NSW, Australia

Gibbs, Leah and Fetterplace, Lachlan and Rees, Matthew and Hanich, Quentin (2020). Effects and effectiveness of lethal shark hazard management: The Shark Meshing (Bather Protection) Program, NSW, Australia. People and nature - a journal of relational thinking. 2 , 189-203
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Abstract

1. ‘Shark attack’ presents a considerable social-environmental challenge. Each year a small number of people are injured or killed by shark bite. Concurrently, sharks and other marine life are subject to unprecedented anthropogenic pressures.
2. Shark hazard management varies globally, but lethal strategies are common, with negative consequences for species and environments. Of particular concern are the effects for threatened species.3. Lethal strategies have recently come under criticism, based on the negative effects for marine life, effectiveness for human safety and inconsistency with contempo-rary values. Moves to improve both safety and conservation can be hindered by polarized debate.
4. We present a case study of the world's longest-running lethal shark hazard man-agement program, the Shark Meshing (Bather Protection) Program, New South Wales, Australia. We take an interdisciplinary approach to bring into conversa-tion factors that contribute to safety and conservation outcomes. To date, most research focuses on one or other of these areas. We seek to synthesize the factors that are not previously considered in relation to each other.
5. Our aims were to: (a) identify and critique the diverse factors that determine the outcomes of the program; (b) assess the negative effects of the program for sharks and other marine life; and (c) assess the effectiveness of the program for reducing threat of shark interactions.
6. We find that: (a) multiple social and environmental factors contribute to pro-gram outcomes; (b) total shark numbers and populations of key target species – white shark (Carcharodon carcharias), tiger shark (Galeocerdo cuvier) and bull shark (Carcharhinus leucas) – have declined over the program's 80 years, as have a number of non-target species; (c) incidence of shark bite has declined since the program's introduction, but two external points warrant attention.
7. First, key factors influencing the shark bite incidence are frequently overlooked, namely changing cultures of beach- and ocean-use, advances in beach patrol, and emergency and medical response. Second, the proportion of bites leading to fatal-ity has decreased significantly in recent decades.
8. Beach patrol and emergency response contribute to human safety and well-being without the negative consequences of lethal strategies. As such, they offer a focus for future shark hazard management and research

Authors/Creators:Gibbs, Leah and Fetterplace, Lachlan and Rees, Matthew and Hanich, Quentin
Title:Effects and effectiveness of lethal shark hazard management: The Shark Meshing (Bather Protection) Program, NSW, Australia
Year of publishing :2020
Volume:2
Page range:189-203
Number of Pages:14
Publisher:John Wiley & Sons Ltd, British Ecological Society
ISSN:2575-8314
Language:English
Publication Type:Journal article
Article category:Scientific peer reviewed
Version:Published version
Copyright:Creative Commons: Attribution 4.0
Full Text Status:Public
Subjects:(A) Swedish standard research categories 2011 > 5 Social Sciences > 509 Other Social Sciences > Social Sciences Interdisciplinary (Peace and Conflict Research and Studies on Sustainable Society)
(A) Swedish standard research categories 2011 > 4 Agricultural Sciences > 401 Agricultural, Forestry and Fisheries > Fish and Aquacultural Science
(A) Swedish standard research categories 2011 > 1 Natural sciences > 106 Biological Sciences (Medical to be 3 and Agricultural to be 4) > Ecology
Keywords:beach patrol, human-wildlife conflict, shark attack, shark nets, threatened species
URN:NBN:urn:nbn:se:slu:epsilon-p-103113
Permanent URL:
http://urn.kb.se/resolve?urn=urn:nbn:se:slu:epsilon-p-103113
Additional ID:
Type of IDID
DOI10.1002/pan3.10063
ID Code:16765
Faculty:NJ - Fakulteten för naturresurser och jordbruksvetenskap
Department:(NL, NJ) > Department of Aquatic Resources
Deposited By: SLUpub Connector
Deposited On:04 May 2020 07:49
Metadata Last Modified:04 May 2020 07:49

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