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Population Connectivity Predicts Vulnerability to White-Nose Syndrome in the Chilean Myotis (Myotis chiloensis)-A Genomics Approach

Lilley, Thomas M. and Sävilammi, Tiina and Ossa, Gonzalo and Blomberg, Anna S. and Vasemägi, Anti and Yung, Veronica and Vendrami, David L. J. and Johnson, Joseph S. (2020). Population Connectivity Predicts Vulnerability to White-Nose Syndrome in the Chilean Myotis (Myotis chiloensis)-A Genomics Approach. G3. 10 , 2117-2126
[Journal article]

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Abstract

Despite its peculiar distribution, the biology of the southernmost bat species in the world, the Chilean myotis (Myotis chiloensis), has garnered little attention so far. The species has a north-south distribution of c. 2800 km, mostly on the eastern side of the Andes mountain range. Use of extended torpor occurs in the southernmost portion of the range, putting the species at risk of bat white-nose syndrome, a fungal disease responsible for massive population declines in North American bats. Here, we examined how geographic distance and topology would be reflected in the population structure of M. chiloensis along the majority of its range using a double digestion RAD-seq method. We sampled 66 individuals across the species range and discovered pronounced isolation-by-distance. Furthermore, and surprisingly, we found higher degrees of heterozygosity in the southernmost populations compared to the north. A coalescence analysis revealed that our populations may still not have reached secondary contact after the Last Glacial Maximum. As for the potential spread of pathogens, such as the fungus causing WNS, connectivity among populations was noticeably low, especially between the southern hibernatory populations in the Magallanes and Tierra del Fuego, and more northerly populations. This suggests the probability of geographic spread of the disease from the north through bat-to-bat contact to susceptible populations is low. The study presents a rare case of defined population structure in a bat species and warrants further research on the underlying factors contributing to this. See the graphical abstract here.

Authors/Creators:Lilley, Thomas M. and Sävilammi, Tiina and Ossa, Gonzalo and Blomberg, Anna S. and Vasemägi, Anti and Yung, Veronica and Vendrami, David L. J. and Johnson, Joseph S.
Title:Population Connectivity Predicts Vulnerability to White-Nose Syndrome in the Chilean Myotis (Myotis chiloensis)-A Genomics Approach
Year of publishing :2020
Volume:10
Page range:2117-2126
Number of Pages:10
Publisher:Genetics Society of America (GSA)
ISSN:2160-1836
Language:English
Publication Type:Journal article
Article category:Scientific peer reviewed
Version:Published version
Copyright:Creative Commons: Attribution 4.0
Full Text Status:Public
Subjects:(A) Swedish standard research categories 2011 > 1 Natural sciences > 106 Biological Sciences (Medical to be 3 and Agricultural to be 4) > Genetics (medical genetics to be 30107 and agricultural genetics to be 40402)
Keywords:Population genetics, population connectivity, population structure, chiroptera, disease spread
URN:NBN:urn:nbn:se:slu:epsilon-p-106735
Permanent URL:
http://urn.kb.se/resolve?urn=urn:nbn:se:slu:epsilon-p-106735
Additional ID:
Type of IDID
DOI10.1534/g3.119.401009
Web of Science (WoS)000539281600029
ID Code:17282
Faculty:NJ - Fakulteten för naturresurser och jordbruksvetenskap
Department:(NL, NJ) > Department of Aquatic Resources
Deposited By: SLUpub Connector
Deposited On:19 Aug 2020 12:04
Metadata Last Modified:19 Aug 2020 12:04

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