Home About Browse Search
Svenska


What is good for birds is not always good for lichens: Interactions between forest structure and species richness in managed boreal forests

Klein, Julian and Thor, Göran and Low, Matthew and Sjögren, Jörgen and Lindberg, Eva and Eggers, Sönke (2020). What is good for birds is not always good for lichens: Interactions between forest structure and species richness in managed boreal forests. Forest Ecology and Management. 473 , 118327 , 1-11
[Journal article]

[img] PDF
1MB

Abstract

Forestry in the boreal region increasingly replaces natural disturbances in shaping biodiversity. Large-scale removal of small diameter trees (thinning), is ubiquitous in northern European forestry, yet an understanding of how it relates to biodiversity across taxa is lacking. To address this, we examined how two forest structural elements, commonly impacted by forest thinning (i.e. vegetation density in the understory and overstory), are correlated with the species richness of forest-dwelling birds and epiphytic lichens. These taxa were chosen because they likely have opposing habitat demands: epiphytic lichens potentially benefitting from more light in open forests, and birds benefitting from structurally complex forests for foraging, nesting and cover. We used remote sensing tools, already applied in forestry planning, to see if management recommendations could be found that balance the needs of both taxonomic groups within the same forests. Our results show that richness in epiphytic lichens and forest-dwelling birds is not correlated and that a high species richness (similar to 15 birds & similar to 40 epiphytic lichens) in both taxa is only predicted in the same stand under a specific vertical distribution and density of the forest's vegetation: this occurs when the vegetation above 3 m is open (to promote epiphytic lichen richness) and below 3 m is dense (to promote bird richness). Dense vegetation up to 7 m above ground has a diverging effect on forest birds (positive) and epiphytic lichens (negative). A larger stem diameter further increases species richness in both taxa. Our study provides results that are directly implementable in forestry planning over large areas with the help of remote sensing tools (LiDAR).

Authors/Creators:Klein, Julian and Thor, Göran and Low, Matthew and Sjögren, Jörgen and Lindberg, Eva and Eggers, Sönke
Title:What is good for birds is not always good for lichens: Interactions between forest structure and species richness in managed boreal forests
Year of publishing :2020
Volume:473
Article number:118327
Number of Pages:11
Publisher:ELSEVIER
ISSN:0378-1127
Language:English
Publication Type:Journal article
Article category:Scientific peer reviewed
Version:Published version
Copyright:Creative Commons: Attribution 4.0
Full Text Status:Public
Subjects:(A) Swedish standard research categories 2011 > 4 Agricultural Sciences > 401 Agricultural, Forestry and Fisheries > Forest Science
(A) Swedish standard research categories 2011 > 1 Natural sciences > 106 Biological Sciences (Medical to be 3 and Agricultural to be 4) > Ecology
Keywords:Multi taxa, LiDAR, Thinning, Vegetation density, Boreal forest, Bayesian
URN:NBN:urn:nbn:se:slu:epsilon-p-107155
Permanent URL:
http://urn.kb.se/resolve?urn=urn:nbn:se:slu:epsilon-p-107155
Additional ID:
Type of IDID
DOI10.1016/j.foreco.2020.118327
Web of Science (WoS)000551979700048
ID Code:17443
Faculty:NJ - Fakulteten för naturresurser och jordbruksvetenskap
S - Faculty of Forest Sciences
Department:(S) > Dept. of Forest Resource Management
(NL, NJ) > Dept. of Forest Resource Management

(NL, NJ) > Dept. of Ecology
(S) > Dept. of Ecology

(S) > Dept. of Wildlife, Fish and Environmental Studies
Deposited By: SLUpub Connector
Deposited On:14 Sep 2020 09:21
Metadata Last Modified:14 Sep 2020 09:21

Repository Staff Only: item control page

Downloads

Downloads per year (since September 2012)

View more statistics

Downloads
Hits