Home About Browse Search
Svenska


Evaluation of Poultry Stunning with Low Atmospheric Pressure, Carbon Dioxide or Nitrogen Using a Single Aversion Testing Paradigm

Gent, Thomas C. and Gebhardt-Henrich, Sabine and Schild, Sarah-Lina and Rahman, Abdulsatar Abdel and Toscano, Michael J. (2020). Evaluation of Poultry Stunning with Low Atmospheric Pressure, Carbon Dioxide or Nitrogen Using a Single Aversion Testing Paradigm. Animals. 10 , 1308
[Journal article]

[img] PDF
1MB

Abstract

Simple Summary The use of gas stunning for poultry in the abattoir is considered preferable from a welfare and ethical perspective since it reduces the need for stressful handling and birds do not need to be separated from each other. Stunning with low atmospheric pressure is thought to be less stressful than the widely used carbon dioxide; however, there are no published studies directly comparing their aversiveness. Here we trained broiler breeders to indicate aversion to either carbon dioxide, low atmospheric pressure or the inert gas nitrogen, by relinquishing a food reward to seek a preferable environment. We found that exposure to carbon dioxide resulted in the rapid cessation of feeding, whereas with low atmospheric pressure and nitrogen, birds continued to eat for longer. We further found that carbon dioxide exposure resulted in more aversion behaviours, such as headshaking and gasping. These findings suggest that both low atmospheric pressure and nitrogen offer a welfare refinement to gas stunning with carbon dioxide in poultry. Low atmospheric pressure stunning (LAPS) has been suggested for use in poultry under 4 kg in the abattoir as a more humane alternative to carbon dioxide (CO2). However, there are currently no studies offering a direct comparison of the aversion between methods. Here, we trained adult female broiler breeders to relinquish a food reward by moving to another area of the gas chamber in response to aversive stimuli. They were then stunned and subsequently killed using single exposure to either CO2, N-2, LAPS or medical air as a control. Birds exposed to CO(2)relinquished the food reward the quickest and exhibited gasping and headshaking more than the other groups. LAPS resulted in the quickest time to loss of posture (LOP) and birds in the N(2)group took the longest. Birds exposed to N(2)displayed the longest duration of ataxia of any group; however, they did not show any wing-flapping prior to LOP, unlike the LAPS and CO2. Collectively these data demonstrate that both LAPS and N(2)are less aversive to poultry than CO(2)and may offer a significant welfare refinement for poultry killed for meat production.

Authors/Creators:Gent, Thomas C. and Gebhardt-Henrich, Sabine and Schild, Sarah-Lina and Rahman, Abdulsatar Abdel and Toscano, Michael J.
Title:Evaluation of Poultry Stunning with Low Atmospheric Pressure, Carbon Dioxide or Nitrogen Using a Single Aversion Testing Paradigm
Year of publishing :2020
Volume:10
Article number:1308
Number of Pages:16
ISSN:2076-2615
Language:English
Publication Type:Journal article
Article category:Scientific peer reviewed
Version:Published version
Copyright:Creative Commons: Attribution 4.0
Full Text Status:Public
Subjects:(A) Swedish standard research categories 2011 > 4 Agricultural Sciences > 402 Animal and Dairy Science > Animal and Dairy Science.
Keywords:euthanasia, low atmospheric pressure stunning, CO2, N-2, broiler breeder, poultry, aversion test
URN:NBN:urn:nbn:se:slu:epsilon-p-107856
Permanent URL:
http://urn.kb.se/resolve?urn=urn:nbn:se:slu:epsilon-p-107856
Additional ID:
Type of IDID
DOI10.3390/ani10081308
Web of Science (WoS)000567067900001
ID Code:17595
Faculty:LTV - Fakulteten för landskapsarkitektur, trädgårds- och växtproduktionsvetenskap
Department:(LTJ, LTV) > Department of Biosystems and Technology (from 130101)
(VH) > Department of Biosystems and Technology (from 130101)
Deposited By: SLUpub Connector
Deposited On:24 Sep 2020 14:15
Metadata Last Modified:24 Sep 2020 14:21

Repository Staff Only: item control page

Downloads

Downloads per year (since September 2012)

View more statistics

Downloads
Hits