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Reconstruction of the birth of a male sex chromosome present in Atlantic herring

Rafati, Nima and Chen, Junfeng and Herpin, Amaury and Pettersson, Mats E. and Han, Fan and Feng, Chungang and Wallerman, Ola and Rubin, Carl-Johan and Peron, Sandrine and Cocco, Arianna and Larsson, Marten and Troetschel, Christian and Poetsch, Ansgar and Korsching, Kai and Bönigk, Wolfgang and Körschen, Heinz G. and Berg, Florian and Folkvord, Arild and Kaupp, U. Benjamin and Schartl, Manfred and Andersson, Leif (2020). Reconstruction of the birth of a male sex chromosome present in Atlantic herring. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America. 117 , 24359-24368
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Abstract

The mechanisms underlying sex determination are astonishingly plastic. Particularly the triggers for the molecular machinery, which recalls either the male or female developmental program, are highly variable and have evolved independently and repeatedly. Fish show a huge variety of sex determination systems, including both genetic and environmental triggers. The advent of sex chromosomes is assumed to stabilize genetic sex determination. However, because sex chromosomes are notoriously cluttered with repetitive DNA and pseudogenes, the study of their evolution is hampered. Here we reconstruct the birth of a Y chromosome present in the Atlantic herring. The region is tiny (230 kb) and contains only three intact genes. The candidate male-determining gene BMPR1BBY encodes a truncated form of a BMP1B receptor, which originated by gene duplication and translocation and underwent rapid protein evolution. BMPR1BBY phosphorylates SMADs in the absence of ligand and thus has the potential to induce testis formation. The Y region also contains two genes encoding subunits of the sperm-specific Ca2+ channel CatSper required for male fertility. The herring Y chromosome conforms with a characteristic feature of many sex chromosomes, namely, suppressed recombination between a sex-determining factor and genes that are beneficial for the given sex. However, the herring Y differs from other sex chromosomes in that suppression of recombination is restricted to an similar to 500-kb region harboring the male-specific and sex-associated regions. As a consequence, any degeneration on the herring Y chromosome is restricted to those genes located in the small region affected by suppressed recombination.

Authors/Creators:Rafati, Nima and Chen, Junfeng and Herpin, Amaury and Pettersson, Mats E. and Han, Fan and Feng, Chungang and Wallerman, Ola and Rubin, Carl-Johan and Peron, Sandrine and Cocco, Arianna and Larsson, Marten and Troetschel, Christian and Poetsch, Ansgar and Korsching, Kai and Bönigk, Wolfgang and Körschen, Heinz G. and Berg, Florian and Folkvord, Arild and Kaupp, U. Benjamin and Schartl, Manfred and Andersson, Leif
Title:Reconstruction of the birth of a male sex chromosome present in Atlantic herring
Year of publishing :2020
Volume:117
Page range:24359-24368
Number of Pages:10
Publisher:NATL ACAD SCIENCES
ISSN:0027-8424
Language:English
Publication Type:Journal article
Article category:Scientific peer reviewed
Version:Published version
Copyright:Creative Commons: Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0
Full Text Status:Public
Subjects:(A) Swedish standard research categories 2011 > 1 Natural sciences > 106 Biological Sciences (Medical to be 3 and Agricultural to be 4) > Evolutionary Biology
Keywords:sex determination, BMPR1, CatSper, gene duplication, molecular evolution
URN:NBN:urn:nbn:se:slu:epsilon-p-108385
Permanent URL:
http://urn.kb.se/resolve?urn=urn:nbn:se:slu:epsilon-p-108385
Additional ID:
Type of IDID
DOI10.1073/pnas.2009925117
Web of Science (WoS)000576672700018
ID Code:18071
Faculty:VH - Faculty of Veterinary Medicine and Animal Science
Department:(VH) > Dept. of Animal Breeding and Genetics
Deposited By: SLUpub Connector
Deposited On:04 Nov 2020 13:23
Metadata Last Modified:04 Nov 2020 13:31

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