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Differences in growth-economics of fast vs. slow growing grass species in response to temperature and nitrogen limitation individually, and in combination

Colesie, Claudia and Stangl, Zsofia Reka and Hurry, Vaughan (2020). Differences in growth-economics of fast vs. slow growing grass species in response to temperature and nitrogen limitation individually, and in combination. BMC Ecology. 20 , 63
[Research article]

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Abstract

Background Fast growing invasive alien species are highly efficient with little investment in their tissues. They often outcompete slower growing species with severe consequences for diversity and community composition. The plant economics trait-based approach provides a theoretical framework, allowing the classification of plants with different performance characteristics. However, in multifaceted background, this approach needs testing. The evaluation and prediction of plant performance outcomes in ecologically relevant settings is among the most pressing topics to understand and predict ecosystem functioning, especially in a quickly changing environment. Temperature and nutrient availability are major components of the global environmental change and this study examines the response of growth economic traits, photosynthesis and respiration to such changes for an invasive fast-growing (Bromus hordaceus) and a slow-growing perennial (Bromus erectus) grass species. Results The fully controlled growth chamber experiment simulated temperature-and changes in nitrogen availability individually and in combination. We therefore provide maximum control and monitoring of growth responses allowing general growth trait response patterns to be tested. Under optimal nitrogen availability the slow growing B. erectus was better able to handle the lower temperatures (7 degrees C) whilst both species had problems at higher temperatures (30 degrees C). Stresses produced by a combination of heat and nutrient availability were identified to be less limiting for the slow growing species but the combination of chilling with low nutrient availability was most detrimental to both species. Conclusions For the fast-growing invader B. hordeaceus a reduction of nitrogen availability in combination with a temperature increase, leads to limited growth performance in comparison to the slow-growing perennial species B.erectus and this may explain why nutrient-rich habitats often experience more invasion than resource-poor habitats.

Authors/Creators:Colesie, Claudia and Stangl, Zsofia Reka and Hurry, Vaughan
Title:Differences in growth-economics of fast vs. slow growing grass species in response to temperature and nitrogen limitation individually, and in combination
Series Name/Journal:BMC Ecology
Year of publishing :2020
Volume:20
Article number:63
Number of Pages:13
ISSN:1472-6785
Language:English
Publication Type:Research article
Article category:Scientific peer reviewed
Version:Published version
Copyright:Creative Commons: Attribution 4.0
Full Text Status:Public
Subjects:(A) Swedish standard research categories 2011 > 1 Natural sciences > 106 Biological Sciences (Medical to be 3 and Agricultural to be 4) > Ecology
Keywords:Plant trait coordination, Stress physiology, Nutrient availability, Invasive species, Functional type, Ecophysiology, Carbon, Strategy, Root
URN:NBN:urn:nbn:se:slu:epsilon-p-109815
Permanent URL:
http://urn.kb.se/resolve?urn=urn:nbn:se:slu:epsilon-p-109815
Additional ID:
Type of IDID
DOI10.1186/s12898-020-00333-3
Web of Science (WoS)000595736000001
ID Code:21275
Faculty:S - Faculty of Forest Sciences
Department:(S) > Dept. of Forest Ecology and Management
(S) > Dept. of Forest Genetics and Plant Physiology
Deposited By: SLUpub Connector
Deposited On:19 Jan 2021 13:43
Metadata Last Modified:19 Jan 2021 13:51

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