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Estimating retention benchmarks for salvage logging to protect biodiversity

Thorn, Simon and Chao, Anne and Georgiev, Kostadin B. and Mueller, Joerg and Baessler, Claus and Campbell, John L. and Castro, Jorge and Chen, Yan-Han and Choi, Chang-Yong and Cobb, Tyler P. and Donato, Daniel C. and Durska, Ewa and Macdonald, Ellen and Feldhaar, Heike and Fontaine, Joseph B. and Fornwalt, Paula J. and Hernandez, Raquel Maria Hernandez and Hutto, Richard L. and Koivula, Matti and Lee, Eun-Jae and Lindenmayer, David and Mikusinski, Grzegorz and Obrist, Martin K. and Perlik, Michal and Rost, Josep and Waldron, Kaysandra and Wermelinger, Beat and Weiss, Ingmar and Zmihorski, Michal and Leverkus, Alexandro B. (2020). Estimating retention benchmarks for salvage logging to protect biodiversity. Nature Communications. 11 , 4762
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Abstract

Forests are increasingly affected by natural disturbances. Subsequent salvage logging, a widespread management practice conducted predominantly to recover economic capital, produces further disturbance and impacts biodiversity worldwide. Hence, naturally disturbed forests are among the most threatened habitats in the world, with consequences for their associated biodiversity. However, there are no evidence-based benchmarks for the proportion of area of naturally disturbed forests to be excluded from salvage logging to conserve biodiversity. We apply a mixed rarefaction/extrapolation approach to a global multi-taxa dataset from disturbed forests, including birds, plants, insects and fungi, to close this gap. We find that 757% (mean +/- SD) of a naturally disturbed area of a forest needs to be left unlogged to maintain 90% richness of its unique species, whereas retaining 50% of a naturally disturbed forest unlogged maintains 73 +/- 12% of its unique species richness. These values do not change with the time elapsed since disturbance but vary considerably among taxonomic groups. Salvage logging has become a common practice to gain economic returns from naturally disturbed forests, but it could have considerable negative effects on biodiversity. Here the authors use a recently developed statistical method to estimate that ca. 75% of the naturally disturbed forest should be left unlogged to maintain 90% of the species unique to the area.

Authors/Creators:Thorn, Simon and Chao, Anne and Georgiev, Kostadin B. and Mueller, Joerg and Baessler, Claus and Campbell, John L. and Castro, Jorge and Chen, Yan-Han and Choi, Chang-Yong and Cobb, Tyler P. and Donato, Daniel C. and Durska, Ewa and Macdonald, Ellen and Feldhaar, Heike and Fontaine, Joseph B. and Fornwalt, Paula J. and Hernandez, Raquel Maria Hernandez and Hutto, Richard L. and Koivula, Matti and Lee, Eun-Jae and Lindenmayer, David and Mikusinski, Grzegorz and Obrist, Martin K. and Perlik, Michal and Rost, Josep and Waldron, Kaysandra and Wermelinger, Beat and Weiss, Ingmar and Zmihorski, Michal and Leverkus, Alexandro B.
Title:Estimating retention benchmarks for salvage logging to protect biodiversity
Series Name/Journal:Nature Communications
Year of publishing :2020
Volume:11
Article number:4762
Number of Pages:8
Publisher:NATURE RESEARCH
ISSN:2041-1723
Language:English
Publication Type:Journal article
Article category:Scientific peer reviewed
Version:Published version
Copyright:Creative Commons: Attribution 4.0
Full Text Status:Public
Subjects:(A) Swedish standard research categories 2011 > 4 Agricultural Sciences > 401 Agricultural, Forestry and Fisheries > Forest Science
URN:NBN:urn:nbn:se:slu:epsilon-p-110100
Permanent URL:
http://urn.kb.se/resolve?urn=urn:nbn:se:slu:epsilon-p-110100
Additional ID:
Type of IDID
DOI10.1038/s41467-020-18612-4
Web of Science (WoS)000598892400002
ID Code:21522
Faculty:S - Faculty of Forest Sciences
Department:(NL, NJ) > Dept. of Ecology
(S) > Dept. of Ecology

(S) > School for Forest Management
Deposited By: SLUpub Connector
Deposited On:22 Jan 2021 13:03
Metadata Last Modified:22 Jan 2021 13:11

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