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Disaggregating the effects of nitrogen addition on gross primary production in a boreal Scots pine forest

Tian, Xianglin and Minunno, Francesco and Schiestl-Aalto, Pauliina and Chi, Jinshu and Zhao, Peng and Peichl, Matthias and Marshall, John D and Näsholm, Torgny and Lim, Hyungwoo and Peltoniemi, Mikko and Linder, Sune and Makela, Annikki (2021). Disaggregating the effects of nitrogen addition on gross primary production in a boreal Scots pine forest. Agricultural and Forest Meteorology. 301 , 108337
[Research article]

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Abstract

Adding nitrogen to boreal forest ecosystems commonly increases gross primary production (GPP). The effect of nitrogen addition on ecosystem GPP is convoluted due to the impacts of and interactions among leaf scale photosynthetic productivity, canopy structure, site fertility, and environmental constraints. We used a unique controlled nitrogen fertilisation experiment combined with eddy covariance measurements and the calibration of a LUE-based (light use efficiency) photosynthetic production model in order to reveal differences in photosynthetic capacity due to nitrogen addition. A systematically designed soil moisture survey was conducted to characterise the within-site spatial heterogeneity and validate the difference of water stress between fertilised and control sites. The canopy photosynthetic light responses and environmental constraints were evaluated using an inverse modelling approach. We found that nitrogen fertilisation elevated ecosystem GPP by 24% according to model simulations. This was caused by increases in ecosystem light interception (through an increase in leaf area index (LAI)) and LUE by 7% and 17%, respectively. Nitrogen addition increased canopy potential LUE for both low and high photosynthetic photon flux density (PPFD) conditions. The calculations of leaf area and light interception indicated that the understorey vegetation contributed 9% of ecosystem GPP in the fertilised site and 7% in the control site when assuming a same LUE for trees and shrubs. The constraint arising from atmospheric water demand, rather than soil water stress, was the dominating control of the intra- and inter-annual GPP variations. The uncertainty propagated from soil moisture data is negligible for GPP predictions, but influential in the inference on the severity of the drought. This study demonstrates the combination of the controlled field experiment with the inverse modelling approach provides a powerful tool to quantitatively describe and disaggregate N addition effects on forest ecosystem GPP.

Authors/Creators:Tian, Xianglin and Minunno, Francesco and Schiestl-Aalto, Pauliina and Chi, Jinshu and Zhao, Peng and Peichl, Matthias and Marshall, John D and Näsholm, Torgny and Lim, Hyungwoo and Peltoniemi, Mikko and Linder, Sune and Makela, Annikki
Title:Disaggregating the effects of nitrogen addition on gross primary production in a boreal Scots pine forest
Series Name/Journal:Agricultural and Forest Meteorology
Year of publishing :2021
Volume:301
Article number:108337
Number of Pages:19
Publisher:ELSEVIER
ISSN:0168-1923
Language:English
Publication Type:Research article
Article category:Scientific peer reviewed
Version:Published version
Copyright:Creative Commons: Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0
Full Text Status:Public
Subjects:(A) Swedish standard research categories 2011 > 4 Agricultural Sciences > 401 Agricultural, Forestry and Fisheries > Forest Science
Keywords:Nitrogen addition, Gross primary production, Light use efficiency, Inverse modelling, Environmental restrictions boreal forests
URN:NBN:urn:nbn:se:slu:epsilon-p-111642
Permanent URL:
http://urn.kb.se/resolve?urn=urn:nbn:se:slu:epsilon-p-111642
Additional ID:
Type of IDID
DOI10.1016/j.agrformet.2021.108337
Web of Science (WoS)000635675800002
ID Code:23375
Faculty:S - Faculty of Forest Sciences
Department:(S) > Dept. of Forest Ecology and Management
(S) > Southern Swedish Forest Research Centre
Deposited By: SLUpub Connector
Deposited On:29 Apr 2021 12:04
Metadata Last Modified:29 Apr 2021 12:11

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