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Crown-fire severity is more important than ground-fire severity in determining soil fungal community development in the boreal forest

Pérez Izquierdo, Leticia and Clemmensen, Karina Engelbrecht and Strengbom, Joachim and Granath, Gustaf and Wardle, David A. and Nilsson, Marie-Charlotte and Lindahl, Björn (2021). Crown-fire severity is more important than ground-fire severity in determining soil fungal community development in the boreal forest. Journal of Ecology. 109 , 504-518
[Research article]

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Abstract

Wildfire shapes the structure, dynamic and functioning of boreal forests. With predicted warmer and drier summers, increased incidence and intensity of crown-fires may affect plant-soil interactions with consequences for post-fire fertility and forest productivity.We assessed how severity of crown- and ground-fire in boreal pine forests affected post-fire responses of soil fungal communities and their associated enzyme activities, and how variation in fire severity interacts with salvage (post-fire) logging in impacting soil fungi.Crown fire-induced tree mortality had a stronger impact on fungal biomass and community composition than did ground-fire-induced loss of soil organic matter. Severe crown-fire led to replacement of ectomycorrhizal- and litter-associated fungi by stress-tolerant ascomycetes. Elevated activities of hydrolytic enzymes in burned areas were correlated with root-associated ascomycetes and moulds, suggesting opportunistic exploitation of labile organic substrates. Fire did not, however, increase the abundance of more potent basidiomycete decomposers in the organic layer, nor did it enhance organic matter oxidation by fungal peroxidases, indicating that the potential for major post-fire losses of carbon due to stimulated decomposition is limited. Rather, peroxidase activity was low in burned areas, likely reflecting the absence of ectomycorrhizal fungi. Post-fire salvage logging induced larger shifts in fungal communities in areas with low crown-fire severity.Synthesis. Historically, boreal pine forests have been shaped by low-severity ground-fires. Our study highlights a risk that increasing occurrence of high-severity crown-fire as climate warms will have detrimental effects on mycorrhizal-mediated functions that are pivotal for maintaining organic matter turnover, soil fertility and forest resilience.

Authors/Creators:Pérez Izquierdo, Leticia and Clemmensen, Karina Engelbrecht and Strengbom, Joachim and Granath, Gustaf and Wardle, David A. and Nilsson, Marie-Charlotte and Lindahl, Björn
Title:Crown-fire severity is more important than ground-fire severity in determining soil fungal community development in the boreal forest
Series Name/Journal:Journal of Ecology
Year of publishing :2021
Volume:109
Page range:504-518
Number of Pages:15
Publisher:WILEY
ISSN:0022-0477
Language:English
Publication Type:Research article
Article category:Scientific peer reviewed
Version:Published version
Copyright:Creative Commons: Attribution 4.0
Full Text Status:Public
Subjects:(A) Swedish standard research categories 2011 > 1 Natural sciences > 106 Biological Sciences (Medical to be 3 and Agricultural to be 4) > Ecology
Keywords:decomposition, ectomycorrhiza, enzymes, fire severity, Gadgil effect, mor layer, Pinus sylvestris, salvage logging
URN:NBN:urn:nbn:se:slu:epsilon-p-108708
Permanent URL:
http://urn.kb.se/resolve?urn=urn:nbn:se:slu:epsilon-p-108708
Additional ID:
Type of IDID
DOI10.1111/1365-2745.13529
Web of Science (WoS)000583048300001
ID Code:23703
Faculty:NJ - Fakulteten för naturresurser och jordbruksvetenskap
S - Faculty of Forest Sciences
Department:(NL, NJ) > Dept. of Soil and Environment
(S) > Dept. of Soil and Environment

(NL, NJ) > Dept. of Forest Mycology and Plant Pathology
(S) > Dept. of Forest Mycology and Plant Pathology

(NL, NJ) > Dept. of Ecology
(S) > Dept. of Ecology

(S) > Dept. of Forest Ecology and Management
Deposited By: SLUpub Connector
Deposited On:18 May 2021 12:43
Metadata Last Modified:18 May 2021 12:51

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