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Concentrations of canine prostate specific esterase, CPSE, at baseline are associated with the relative size of the prostate at three-year follow-up

Ström Holst, Bodil and Carlin, Sofia and Fouriez-Lablée, Virginie and Hanås, Sofia and Ödling, Sofie and Langborg, Liss-Marie and Ubhayasekera, S. J. Kumari A. and Bergquist, Jonas and Rydén, Jesper and Holmroos, Elin and Hansson, Kerstin (2021). Concentrations of canine prostate specific esterase, CPSE, at baseline are associated with the relative size of the prostate at three-year follow-up. BMC Veterinary Research. 17 , 173
[Research article]

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Abstract

BackgroundEnlargement of the prostate is associated with prostatic diseases in dogs, and an estimation of prostatic size is a central part in the diagnostic workup. Ultrasonography is often the method of choice, but biomarkers constitute an alternative. Canine prostate specific esterase (CPSE) shares many characteristics with human prostate specific antigen (PSA) and is related to prostate size. In men with clinical symptoms of prostatic disease, PSA concentrations are related to prostate growth. The aims of the present follow-up study were to evaluate if the concentration of CPSE is associated with future growth of the prostate, and if analysis of a panel of 16 steroids gives further information on prostatic growth. Owners of dogs included in a previous study were 3 years later contacted for a follow-up study that included an interview and a clinical examination. The prostate was examined by ultrasonography. Serum concentrations of CPSE were measured, as was a panel of steroids.ResultsOf the 79 dogs included at baseline, owners of 77 dogs (97%) were reached for an interview, and 22 were available for a follow-up examination. Six of the 79 dogs had clinical signs of prostatic disease at baseline, and eight of the remaining 73 dogs (11%) developed clinical signs between baseline and follow-up, information was lacking for two dogs. Development of clinical signs was significantly more common in dogs with a relative prostate size of >= 2.5 at baseline (n=20) than in dogs with smaller prostates (n=51). Serum concentrations of CPSE at baseline were not associated with the change in prostatic size between baseline and follow-up. Serum concentrations of CPSE at baseline and at follow-up were positively associated with the relative prostatic size (S-rel) at follow-up. Concentrations of corticosterone (P = 0.024), and the class corticosteroids (P = 0.0035) were positively associated with the difference in S-rel between baseline and follow-up.ConclusionsThe results support the use of CPSE for estimating present and future prostatic size in dogs >= 4years, and the clinical usefulness of prostatic size for predicting development of clinical signs of prostatic disease in the dog. The association between corticosteroids and prostate growth warrants further investigation.

Authors/Creators:Ström Holst, Bodil and Carlin, Sofia and Fouriez-Lablée, Virginie and Hanås, Sofia and Ödling, Sofie and Langborg, Liss-Marie and Ubhayasekera, S. J. Kumari A. and Bergquist, Jonas and Rydén, Jesper and Holmroos, Elin and Hansson, Kerstin
Title:Concentrations of canine prostate specific esterase, CPSE, at baseline are associated with the relative size of the prostate at three-year follow-up
Series Name/Journal:BMC Veterinary Research
Year of publishing :2021
Volume:17
Article number:173
Number of Pages:10
Publisher:BMC
ISSN:1746-6148
Language:English
Publication Type:Research article
Article category:Scientific peer reviewed
Version:Published version
Copyright:Creative Commons: Attribution 4.0
Full Text Status:Public
Subjects:(A) Swedish standard research categories 2011 > 4 Agricultural Sciences > 403 Veterinary Science > Clinical Science
Keywords:Dog, Steroids, Corticosteroids, Prostate hyperplasia, Biomarker, Ultrasound
URN:NBN:urn:nbn:se:slu:epsilon-p-111915
Permanent URL:
http://urn.kb.se/resolve?urn=urn:nbn:se:slu:epsilon-p-111915
Additional ID:
Type of IDID
DOI10.1186/s12917-021-02874-1
Web of Science (WoS)000646881400001
ID Code:23731
Faculty:VH - Faculty of Veterinary Medicine and Animal Science
University Animal Hospital
NJ - Fakulteten för naturresurser och jordbruksvetenskap
Department:(VH) > Dept. of Clinical Sciences
University Animal Hospital (UAH)
(NL, NJ) > Dept. of Energy and Technology
Deposited By: SLUpub Connector
Deposited On:21 May 2021 10:43
Metadata Last Modified:21 May 2021 10:51

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