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Synergistic and antagonistic effects of land use and non-native species on community responses to climate change

Auffret, Alistair and Thomas, Chris D (2019). Synergistic and antagonistic effects of land use and non-native species on community responses to climate change. Global Change Biology. 25 , 4303-4314
[Research article]

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Abstract

Climate change, land-use change and introductions of non-native species are key determinants of biodiversity change worldwide. However, the extent to which anthropogenic drivers of environmental change interact to affect biological communities is largely unknown, especially over longer time periods. Here, we show that plant community composition in 996 Swedish landscapes has consistently shifted to reflect the warmer and wetter climate that the region has experienced during the second half of the 20th century. Using community climatic indices, which reflect the average climatic associations of the species within each landscape at each time period, we found that species compositions in 74% of landscapes now have a higher representation of warm-associated species than they did previously, while 84% of landscapes now host more species associated with higher levels of precipitation. In addition to a warmer and wetter climate, there have also been large shifts in land use across the region, while the fraction of non-native species has increased in the majority of landscapes. Climatic warming at the landscape level appeared to favour the colonization of warm-associated species, while also potentially driving losses in cool-associated species. However, the resulting increases in community thermal means were apparently buffered by landscape simplification (reduction in habitat heterogeneity within landscapes) in the form of increased forest cover. Increases in non-native species, which generally originate from warmer climates than Sweden, were a strong driver of community-level warming. In terms of precipitation, both landscape simplification and increases in non-natives appeared to favour species associated with drier climatic conditions, to some extent counteracting the climate-driven shift towards wetter communities. Anthropogenic drivers can act both synergistically and antagonistically to determine trajectories of change in biological communities over time. Therefore, it is important to consider multiple drivers of global change when trying to understand, manage and predict biodiversity in the future.

Authors/Creators:Auffret, Alistair and Thomas, Chris D
Title:Synergistic and antagonistic effects of land use and non-native species on community responses to climate change
Series Name/Journal:Global Change Biology
Year of publishing :2019
Volume:25
Page range:4303-4314
Number of Pages:12
Publisher:WILEY
Associated Programs and Other Stakeholders:?? SLU.id.platform-plantprot ??
ISSN:1354-1013
Language:English
Publication Type:Research article
Article category:Scientific peer reviewed
Version:Accepted version
Full Text Status:Public
Subjects:(A) Swedish standard research categories 2011 > 1 Natural sciences > 106 Biological Sciences (Medical to be 3 and Agricultural to be 4) > Ecology
(A) Swedish standard research categories 2011 > 1 Natural sciences > 105 Earth and Related Environmental Sciences > Climate Research
(A) Swedish standard research categories 2011 > 1 Natural sciences > 106 Biological Sciences (Medical to be 3 and Agricultural to be 4) > Botany
Keywords:biodiversity, climatic debt, community thermal index, historical ecology, invasive species, landscape change, precipitation, thermophilzation
URN:NBN:urn:nbn:se:slu:epsilon-p-102759
Permanent URL:
http://urn.kb.se/resolve?urn=urn:nbn:se:slu:epsilon-p-102759
Additional ID:
Type of IDID
DOI10.1111/gcb.14765
Web of Science (WoS)000494691700025
Otherhttps://doi.org/10.1111/gcb.14765
ID Code:24625
Faculty:NJ - Fakulteten för naturresurser och jordbruksvetenskap
Department:(NL, NJ) > Dept. of Ecology
(S) > Dept. of Ecology
Deposited By: SLUpub Connector
Deposited On:21 Jun 2021 15:03
Metadata Last Modified:21 Jun 2021 15:11

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