Home About Browse Search
Svenska


Conserved ancestral tropical niche but different continental histories explain the latitudinal diversity gradient in brush-footed butterflies

Chazot, Nicolas and Condamine, Fabien L. and Dudas, Gytis and Pena, Carlos and Kodandaramaiah, Ullasa and Matos-Maravi, Pavel and Aduse-Poku, Kwaku and Elias, Marianne and Warren, Andrew D. and Lohman, David J. and Penz, Carla M. and DeVries, Phil and Fric, Zdenek F. and Nylin, Soren and Muller, Chris and Kawahara, Akito Y. and Silva-Brandao, Karina L. and Lamas, Gerardo and Kleckova, Irena and Zubek, Anna and Ortiz-Acevedo, Elena and Vila, Roger and Vane-Wright, Richard and Mullen, Sean P. and Jiggins, Chris D. and Wheat, Christopher W. and Freitas, Andre V. L. and Wahlberg, Niklas (2021). Conserved ancestral tropical niche but different continental histories explain the latitudinal diversity gradient in brush-footed butterflies. Nature Communications. 12 , 5717
[Research article]

[img] PDF
5MB

Abstract

The global increase in species richness toward the tropics across continents and taxonomic groups, referred to as the latitudinal diversity gradient, stimulated the formulation of many hypotheses to explain the underlying mechanisms of this pattern. We evaluate several of these hypotheses to explain spatial diversity patterns in a butterfly family, the Nymphalidae, by assessing the contributions of speciation, extinction, and dispersal, and also the extent to which these processes differ among regions at the same latitude. We generate a time-calibrated phylogeny containing 2,866 nymphalid species (similar to 45% of extant diversity). Neither speciation nor extinction rate variations consistently explain the latitudinal diversity gradient among regions because temporal diversification dynamics differ greatly across longitude. The Neotropical diversity results from low extinction rates, not high speciation rates, and biotic interchanges with other regions are rare. Southeast Asia is also characterized by a low speciation rate but, unlike the Neotropics, is the main source of dispersal events through time. Our results suggest that global climate change throughout the Cenozoic, combined with tropical niche conservatism, played a major role in generating the modern latitudinal diversity gradient of nymphalid butterflies.

Authors/Creators:Chazot, Nicolas and Condamine, Fabien L. and Dudas, Gytis and Pena, Carlos and Kodandaramaiah, Ullasa and Matos-Maravi, Pavel and Aduse-Poku, Kwaku and Elias, Marianne and Warren, Andrew D. and Lohman, David J. and Penz, Carla M. and DeVries, Phil and Fric, Zdenek F. and Nylin, Soren and Muller, Chris and Kawahara, Akito Y. and Silva-Brandao, Karina L. and Lamas, Gerardo and Kleckova, Irena and Zubek, Anna and Ortiz-Acevedo, Elena and Vila, Roger and Vane-Wright, Richard and Mullen, Sean P. and Jiggins, Chris D. and Wheat, Christopher W. and Freitas, Andre V. L. and Wahlberg, Niklas
Title:Conserved ancestral tropical niche but different continental histories explain the latitudinal diversity gradient in brush-footed butterflies
Series Name/Journal:Nature Communications
Year of publishing :2021
Volume:12
Article number:5717
Number of Pages:10
Publisher:NATURE PORTFOLIO
ISSN:2041-1723
Language:English
Publication Type:Research article
Article category:Scientific peer reviewed
Version:Published version
Copyright:Creative Commons: Attribution 4.0
Full Text Status:Public
Subjects:(A) Swedish standard research categories 2011 > 1 Natural sciences > 106 Biological Sciences (Medical to be 3 and Agricultural to be 4) > Ecology
URN:NBN:urn:nbn:se:slu:epsilon-p-113957
Permanent URL:
http://urn.kb.se/resolve?urn=urn:nbn:se:slu:epsilon-p-113957
Additional ID:
Type of IDID
DOI10.1038/s41467-021-25906-8
Web of Science (WoS)000702452000015
ID Code:25681
Faculty:NJ - Fakulteten för naturresurser och jordbruksvetenskap
Department:(NL, NJ) > Dept. of Ecology
(S) > Dept. of Ecology
Deposited By: SLUpub Connector
Deposited On:15 Oct 2021 10:25
Metadata Last Modified:15 Oct 2021 10:31

Repository Staff Only: item control page

Downloads

Downloads per year (since September 2012)

View more statistics

Downloads
Hits