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Ecological Memory of Historical Contamination Influences the Response of Phytoplankton Communities

Baho, Didier Ludovic and Baho, Didier L. and Rizzuto, Simone and Nizzetto, Luca and Hessen, Dag O. and Norberg, Jon and Skjelbred, Birger and Jones, Kevin C. and Zhang, Hao and Leu, Eva (2021). Ecological Memory of Historical Contamination Influences the Response of Phytoplankton Communities. Ecosystems. 24 , 1591-1607
[Research article]

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Abstract

Ecological memory (EM) recognizes the importance of previous stress encounters in promoting community tolerance and thereby enhances ecosystem stability, provided that gained tolerances are preserved during non-stress periods. Drawing from this concept, we hypothesized that the recruitment of tolerant species can be facilitated by imposing an initial sorting process (conditioning) during the early stages of community assembly, which should result in higher production (biomass development and photosynthetic efficiency) and stable community composition. To test this, phytoplankton resting stages were germinated from lake sediments originating from two catchments that differed in contamination history: one impacted by long-term herbicides and pesticides exposures (historically contaminated lake) from an agricultural catchment compared to a low-impacted one (near-pristine lake) from a forested catchment. Conditioning was achieved by adding an herbicide (Isoproturon, which was commonly used in the catchment of the historically contaminated lake) during germination. Afterward, the communities obtained from germination were exposed to an increasing gradient of Isoproturon. As hypothesized, upon conditioning, the phytoplankton assemblages from the historically contaminated lake were able to rapidly restore photosynthetic efficiency (p > 0.01) and became structurally (community composition) more resistant to Isoproturon. The communities of the near-pristine lake did not yield these positive effects regardless of conditioning, supporting that EM was a unique attribute of the historically stressed ecosystem. Moreover, assemblages that displayed higher structural resistance concurrently yielded lower biomass, indicating that benefits of EM in increasing structural stability may trade-off with production. Our results clearly indicate that EM can foster ecosystem stability to a recurring stressor.

Authors/Creators:Baho, Didier Ludovic and Baho, Didier L. and Rizzuto, Simone and Nizzetto, Luca and Hessen, Dag O. and Norberg, Jon and Skjelbred, Birger and Jones, Kevin C. and Zhang, Hao and Leu, Eva
Title:Ecological Memory of Historical Contamination Influences the Response of Phytoplankton Communities
Series Name/Journal:Ecosystems
Year of publishing :2021
Volume:24
Page range:1591-1607
Number of Pages:17
Publisher:SPRINGER
ISSN:1432-9840
Language:English
Publication Type:Research article
Article category:Scientific peer reviewed
Version:Published version
Copyright:Creative Commons: Attribution 4.0
Full Text Status:Public
Subjects:(A) Swedish standard research categories 2011 > 1 Natural sciences > 106 Biological Sciences (Medical to be 3 and Agricultural to be 4) > Ecology
Keywords:Ecological memory, Phytoplankton communities, Stability, Recurrent stressor, Community tolerance, Trade-off
URN:NBN:urn:nbn:se:slu:epsilon-p-111487
Permanent URL:
http://urn.kb.se/resolve?urn=urn:nbn:se:slu:epsilon-p-111487
Additional ID:
Type of IDID
DOI10.1007/s10021-021-00604-0
Web of Science (WoS)000631303500002
ID Code:26192
Faculty:NJ - Fakulteten för naturresurser och jordbruksvetenskap
Department:(NL, NJ) > Dept. of Aquatic Sciences and Assessment
Deposited By: SLUpub Connector
Deposited On:23 Nov 2021 01:25
Metadata Last Modified:23 Nov 2021 06:01

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