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How does a wetland plant respond to increasing temperature along a latitudinal gradient?

Lindborg, Regina and Ermold, Matti and Kuglerova, Lenka and Jansson, Roland and Larson, Keith W. and Cousins, Sara A. O. (2021). How does a wetland plant respond to increasing temperature along a latitudinal gradient? Ecology and Evolution. 11 , 16228-16238
[Research article]

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Abstract

Global warming affects plant fitness through changes in functional traits and thereby ecosystem function. Wetlands are declining worldwide, and hence, ecosystem functions linked to wetlands are threatened. We use Caltha palustris "a common wetland plant" to study whether warming affects growth and reproduction differently depending on origin of source population, potentially affecting phenotypic response to local climate. We conducted a 2-year in situ temperature manipulation experiment using clone pairs of C. palustris in four regions, along a 1300-km latitudinal gradient of Sweden. Open-top chambers were used to passively increase temperature, paired with controls. Growth and reproductive traits were measured from 320 plants (four regions x five sites x two treatments x eight plants) over two consecutive seasons to assess the effect of warming over time. We found that warming increased plant height, leaf area, number of leaves, and roots. High-latitude populations responded more strongly to warming than low-latitude populations, especially by increasing leaf area. Warming increased number of flowers in general, but only in the second year, while number of fruits increased in low-latitude populations the first year. Prolonged warming leads to an increase in both number of leaves and flowers over time. While reproduction shows varying and regional responses to warming, impacts on plant growth, especially in high-latitude populations, have more profound effects. Such effects could lead to changes in plant community composition with increased abundance of fast-growing plants with larger leaves and more clones, affecting plant competition and ecological functions such as decomposition and nutrient retention. Effects of warming were highly context dependent; thus, we encourage further use of warming experiments to predict changes in growth, reproduction, and community composition across wetland types and climate gradients targeting different plant forms.

Authors/Creators:Lindborg, Regina and Ermold, Matti and Kuglerova, Lenka and Jansson, Roland and Larson, Keith W. and Cousins, Sara A. O.
Title:How does a wetland plant respond to increasing temperature along a latitudinal gradient?
Series Name/Journal:Ecology and Evolution
Year of publishing :2021
Volume:11
Page range:16228-16238
Number of Pages:11
Publisher:WILEY
ISSN:2045-7758
Language:English
Publication Type:Research article
Article category:Scientific peer reviewed
Version:Published version
Copyright:Creative Commons: Attribution 4.0
Full Text Status:Public
Subjects:(A) Swedish standard research categories 2011 > 1 Natural sciences > 106 Biological Sciences (Medical to be 3 and Agricultural to be 4) > Ecology
Keywords:Caltha palustris, climate change, experiment, open top chamber, traits, wetland
URN:NBN:urn:nbn:se:slu:epsilon-p-114373
Permanent URL:
http://urn.kb.se/resolve?urn=urn:nbn:se:slu:epsilon-p-114373
Additional ID:
Type of IDID
DOI10.1002/ece3.8303
Web of Science (WoS)000713966200001
ID Code:26235
Faculty:S - Faculty of Forest Sciences
Department:(S) > Dept. of Forest Ecology and Management
Deposited By: SLUpub Connector
Deposited On:29 Nov 2021 14:03
Metadata Last Modified:29 Nov 2021 14:11

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