Home About Browse Search
Svenska


The gut microbiome as an indicator of habitat disturbance in a Critically Endangered lemur

McManus, Nicolette and Holmes, Sheila and Johnson, Steig E. and Baden, Andrea L. and Amato, Katherine R. (2021). The gut microbiome as an indicator of habitat disturbance in a Critically Endangered lemur. BMC ecology and evolution. 21 , 222
[Research article]

[img] PDF
2MB

Abstract

Background Habitat disturbance affects the biology and health of animals globally. Understanding the factors that contribute to the differential responses of animals to habitat disturbance is critical for conservation. The gut microbiota represents a potential pathway through which host responses to habitat disturbance might be mediated. However, a lack of quantitative environmental data in many gut microbiome (GM) studies of wild animals limits our ability to pinpoint mechanisms through which habitat disturbance affects the GM. Here, we examine the impact of anthropogenic habitat disturbance on the diet and GM of the Critically Endangered black-and-white ruffed lemur (Varecia variegata editorum). We collected fecal samples and behavioral data from Varecia occupying habitats qualitatively categorized as primary forest, moderately disturbed forest, and heavily disturbed forest. Results Varecia diet and GM composition differed substantially across sites. Dietary richness predicted GM richness across sites, and overall GM composition was strongly correlated to diet composition. Additionally, the consumption of three specific food items positively correlated to the relative abundances of five microbial strains and one microbial genus across sites. However, diet did not explain all of the GM variation in our dataset, and differences in the GM were detected that were not correlated with diet, as measured. Conclusions Our data suggest that diet is an important influence on the Varecia GM across habitats and thus could be leveraged in novel conservation efforts in the future. However, other factors such as contact with humans should also be accounted for. Overall, we demonstrate that quantitative data describing host habitats must be paired with GM data to better target the specific mechanisms through which environmental change affects the GM.

Authors/Creators:McManus, Nicolette and Holmes, Sheila and Johnson, Steig E. and Baden, Andrea L. and Amato, Katherine R.
Title:The gut microbiome as an indicator of habitat disturbance in a Critically Endangered lemur
Series Name/Journal:BMC ecology and evolution
Year of publishing :2021
Volume:21
Article number:222
Number of Pages:16
Publisher:BMC
Language:English
Publication Type:Research article
Article category:Scientific peer reviewed
Version:Published version
Copyright:Creative Commons: Attribution 4.0
Full Text Status:Public
Subjects:(A) Swedish standard research categories 2011 > 1 Natural sciences > 106 Biological Sciences (Medical to be 3 and Agricultural to be 4) > Ecology
Keywords:Varecia, Madagascar, Diet, Host-microbe, Conservation
URN:NBN:urn:nbn:se:slu:epsilon-p-115056
Permanent URL:
http://urn.kb.se/resolve?urn=urn:nbn:se:slu:epsilon-p-115056
Additional ID:
Type of IDID
DOI10.1186/s12862-021-01945-z
Web of Science (WoS)000730925300001
ID Code:26609
Faculty:S - Faculty of Forest Sciences
Department:(S) > Dept. of Wildlife, Fish and Environmental Studies
Deposited By: SLUpub Connector
Deposited On:27 Dec 2021 07:26
Metadata Last Modified:27 Dec 2021 07:31

Repository Staff Only: item control page

Downloads

Downloads per year (since September 2012)

View more statistics

Downloads
Hits