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Land-use intensification differentially affects bacterial, fungal and protist communities and decreases microbiome network complexity

Romdhane, Sana and Spor, Ayme and Banerjee, Samiran and Breuil, Marie-Christine and Bru, David and Chabbi, Abad and Hallin, Sara and van der Heijden, Marcel G. A. and Saghai, Aurélien and Philippot, Laurent (2022). Land-use intensification differentially affects bacterial, fungal and protist communities and decreases microbiome network complexity. Environmental Microbiome. 17 , 1
[Research article]

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Abstract

Background Soil microbial communities are major drivers of cycling of soil nutrients that sustain plant growth and productivity. Yet, a holistic understanding of the impact of land-use intensification on the soil microbiome is still poorly understood. Here, we used a field experiment to investigate the long-term consequences of changes in land-use intensity based on cropping frequency (continuous cropping, alternating cropping with a temporary grassland, perennial grassland) on bacterial, protist and fungal communities as well as on their co-occurrence networks. Results We showed that land use has a major impact on the structure and composition of bacterial, protist and fungal communities. Grassland and arable cropping differed markedly with many taxa differentiating between both land use types. The smallest differences in the microbiome were observed between temporary grassland and continuous cropping, which suggests lasting effects of the cropping system preceding the temporary grasslands. Land-use intensity also affected the bacterial co-occurrence networks with increased complexity in the perennial grassland comparing to the other land-use systems. Similarly, co-occurrence networks within microbial groups showed a higher connectivity in the perennial grasslands. Protists, particularly Rhizaria, dominated in soil microbial associations, as they showed a higher number of connections than bacteria and fungi in all land uses. Conclusions Our findings provide evidence of legacy effects of prior land use on the composition of the soil microbiome. Whatever the land use, network analyses highlighted the importance of protists as a key element of the soil microbiome that should be considered in future work. Altogether, this work provides a holistic perspective of the differential responses of various microbial groups and of their associations to agricultural intensification.

Authors/Creators:Romdhane, Sana and Spor, Ayme and Banerjee, Samiran and Breuil, Marie-Christine and Bru, David and Chabbi, Abad and Hallin, Sara and van der Heijden, Marcel G. A. and Saghai, Aurélien and Philippot, Laurent
Title:Land-use intensification differentially affects bacterial, fungal and protist communities and decreases microbiome network complexity
Series Name/Journal:Environmental Microbiome
Year of publishing :2022
Volume:17
Article number:1
Number of Pages:15
Publisher:BMC
Language:English
Publication Type:Research article
Article category:Scientific peer reviewed
Version:Published version
Copyright:Creative Commons: Attribution 4.0
Full Text Status:Public
Subjects:(A) Swedish standard research categories 2011 > 1 Natural sciences > 106 Biological Sciences (Medical to be 3 and Agricultural to be 4) > Microbiology (Microbiology in the medical area to be 30109)
Keywords:Land-use intensification, Microbial communities, Networks
URN:NBN:urn:nbn:se:slu:epsilon-p-115518
Permanent URL:
http://urn.kb.se/resolve?urn=urn:nbn:se:slu:epsilon-p-115518
Additional ID:
Type of IDID
DOI10.1186/s40793-021-00396-9
Web of Science (WoS)000739969600001
ID Code:26795
Faculty:NJ - Fakulteten för naturresurser och jordbruksvetenskap
Department:(NL, NJ) > Dept. of Forest Mycology and Plant Pathology
(S) > Dept. of Forest Mycology and Plant Pathology
Deposited By: SLUpub Connector
Deposited On:21 Jan 2022 10:26
Metadata Last Modified:21 Jan 2022 10:31

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