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Demographic, life-style and physiological determinants of serum per- and polyfluoroalkyl substance (PFAS) concentrations in a national cross-sectional survey of Swedish adolescents

Nyström, Jennifer and Benskin, Jonathan P. and Plassmann, Merle and Sandblom, Oskar and Glynn, Anders and Lampa, Erik and Gyllenhammar, Irina and Moraeus, Lotta and Lignell, Sanna (2022). Demographic, life-style and physiological determinants of serum per- and polyfluoroalkyl substance (PFAS) concentrations in a national cross-sectional survey of Swedish adolescents. Environmental Research. 208 , 112674
[Research article]

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Abstract

Per: and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) may affect adolescent health, yet factors related to PFAS concentrations in serum are poorly understood. We studied demographic, life-style and physiological determinants of serum PFAS concentrations in Swedish adolescents from a nation-wide survey, Riksmaten Adolescents 2016-17 (RMA, age 10-21 years, n = 1098). Serum samples were analyzed for 42 PFAS, using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. The cumulative probability model was used to estimate associations between serum PFAS and determinants, using ordinal logistic regression. Legacy linear (lin-) perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA), perfluorononaoic acid (PFNA), perfluorodecanoic acid (PFDA), perfluoroundecanoic acid (PFUnDA), lin-perfluorohexanesulfonic acid (PFHxS) and lin-/branched (br-) perfluorooctanesulfonic acid (PFOS) were quantifiable in >= 70% of the samples. The emerging PFAS 9-chlorohexanedecafluoro-3-oxanone-1-sulfonic acid (9Cl-PF3ONS) was quantified in 5.4% of the samples, suggesting initiation of long-range transport far from production sites. Median concentrations of all legacy PFAS were <2 ng/g serum, with a few participants having very high (>100 ng/g serum) lin-PFHxS and lin-/br-PFOS concentrations due to previous high exposure from PFAS-contaminated drinking water. Legacy PFAS exposure was strongly associated with birth country of the participants and their mothers. 2-fold higher estimated adjusted mean (EAM) concentrations were seen among high income country participants with mothers from high income countries than among low/lower-middle income country participants with mothers from the same category. Menstruating females had lower lin-PFOA and br-PFOS EAM concentrations than those who were not. Iron status (plasma ferritin) among females may be a marker of intensity of menstrual bleeding, but it was not significantly associated with legacy PFAS concentrations among females. Further studies are needed to determine how physiological changes occurring around menstruation affect the toxicokinetics of PFAS in females. In conclusion, PFAS are pollutants of the industrialized world and some of the identified determinants may be overlooked confounders/effect modifiers that should be included in future PFAS/health studies among adolescents.

Authors/Creators:Nyström, Jennifer and Benskin, Jonathan P. and Plassmann, Merle and Sandblom, Oskar and Glynn, Anders and Lampa, Erik and Gyllenhammar, Irina and Moraeus, Lotta and Lignell, Sanna
Title:Demographic, life-style and physiological determinants of serum per- and polyfluoroalkyl substance (PFAS) concentrations in a national cross-sectional survey of Swedish adolescents
Series Name/Journal:Environmental Research
Year of publishing :2022
Volume:208
Article number:112674
Number of Pages:13
Publisher:ACADEMIC PRESS INC ELSEVIER SCIENCE
ISSN:0013-9351
Language:English
Publication Type:Research article
Article category:Scientific peer reviewed
Version:Published version
Copyright:Creative Commons: Attribution 4.0
Full Text Status:Public
Subjects:(A) Swedish standard research categories 2011 > 3 Medical and Health Sciences > 303 Health Sciences > Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Keywords:Riksmaten, Biomonitoring, PFAA, Exposure, Demography, Menstruation
URN:NBN:urn:nbn:se:slu:epsilon-p-116246
Permanent URL:
http://urn.kb.se/resolve?urn=urn:nbn:se:slu:epsilon-p-116246
Additional ID:
Type of IDID
DOI10.1016/j.envres.2022.112674
Web of Science (WoS)000751893000002
ID Code:27249
Faculty:VH - Faculty of Veterinary Medicine and Animal Science
Department:(VH) > Department of Biomedical Science and Veterinary Public Health
Deposited By: SLUpub Connector
Deposited On:04 Mar 2022 06:25
Metadata Last Modified:04 Mar 2022 06:31

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