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Follicular fluid and blood levels of persistent organic pollutants and reproductive outcomes among women undergoing assisted reproductive technologies

Bjorvang, Richelle D. and Hallberg, Ida and Pikki, Anne and Berglund, Lars and Pedrelli, Matteo and Lindh, Christian H. and Olovsson, Matts and Persson, Sara and Holte, Jan and Sjunnesson, Ylva and Damdimopoulou, Pauliina (2022). Follicular fluid and blood levels of persistent organic pollutants and reproductive outcomes among women undergoing assisted reproductive technologies. Environmental Research. 208 , 112626
[Research article]

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Abstract

Persistent organic pollutants (POPs) are industrial chemicals resistant to degradation and have been shown to have adverse effects on reproductive health in wildlife and humans. Although regulations have reduced their levels, they are still ubiquitously present and pose a global concern. Here, we studied a cohort of 185 women aged 21-43 years with a median of 2 years of infertility who were seeking assisted reproductive technology (ART) treatment at the Carl von Linne Clinic in Uppsala, Sweden. We analyzed the levels of 9 organochlorine pesticides (OCPs), 10 polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), 3 polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), and 8 perfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs) in the blood and follicular fluid (FF) samples collected during ovum pick-up. Impact of age on chemical transfer from blood to FF was analyzed. Associations of chemicals, both individually and as a mixture, to 10 ART endpoints were investigated using linear, logistic, and weighted quantile sum regression, adjusted for age, body mass index, parity, fatty fish intake and cause of infertility. Out of the 30 chemicals, 20 were detected in more than half of the blood samples and 15 in FF. Chemical transfer from blood to FF increased with age. Chemical groups in blood crossed the blood-follicle barrier at different rates: OCPs > PCBs > PFASs. Hexachlorobenzene, an OCP, was associated with lower anti-Miillerian hormone, clinical pregnancy, and live birth. PCBs and PFASs were associated with higher antral follicle count and ovarian response as measured by ovarian sensitivity index, but also with lower embryo quality. As a mixture, similar findings were seen for the sum of PCBs and PFASs. Our results suggest that age plays a role in the chemical transfer from blood to FF and that exposure to POPs significantly associates with ART outcomes. We strongly encourage further studies to elucidate the underlying mechanisms of reproductive effects of POPs in humans.

Authors/Creators:Bjorvang, Richelle D. and Hallberg, Ida and Pikki, Anne and Berglund, Lars and Pedrelli, Matteo and Lindh, Christian H. and Olovsson, Matts and Persson, Sara and Holte, Jan and Sjunnesson, Ylva and Damdimopoulou, Pauliina
Title:Follicular fluid and blood levels of persistent organic pollutants and reproductive outcomes among women undergoing assisted reproductive technologies
Series Name/Journal:Environmental Research
Year of publishing :2022
Volume:208
Article number:112626
Number of Pages:10
Publisher:ACADEMIC PRESS INC ELSEVIER SCIENCE
ISSN:0013-9351
Language:English
Publication Type:Research article
Article category:Scientific peer reviewed
Version:Published version
Copyright:Creative Commons: Attribution 4.0
Full Text Status:Public
Subjects:(A) Swedish standard research categories 2011 > 1 Natural sciences > 105 Earth and Related Environmental Sciences > Environmental Sciences (social aspects to be 507)
Keywords:Persistent organic pollutants, Assisted reproductive technologies, Follicular fluid, Ovarian sensitivity index, Embryo quality, Live birth
URN:NBN:urn:nbn:se:slu:epsilon-p-116251
Permanent URL:
http://urn.kb.se/resolve?urn=urn:nbn:se:slu:epsilon-p-116251
Additional ID:
Type of IDID
DOI10.1016/j.envres.2021.112626
Web of Science (WoS)000752019000013
ID Code:27266
Faculty:VH - Faculty of Veterinary Medicine and Animal Science
Department:(VH) > Dept. of Clinical Sciences
Deposited By: SLUpub Connector
Deposited On:07 Mar 2022 16:25
Metadata Last Modified:07 Mar 2022 16:31

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