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Are consumers in developing countries willing to pay for aquaculture food safety certification? Evidence from a field experiment in Nigeria

Tran, Nhuong and Shikuku, Kelvin and Hoffmann, Vivian and Lagerkvist, Carl-Johan and Pincus, Lauren and Akintola, Shehu Latunji and Fakoya, Kafayat Adetoun and Olagunju, Olanrewaju Femi and Bailey, Conner (2022). Are consumers in developing countries willing to pay for aquaculture food safety certification? Evidence from a field experiment in Nigeria. Aquaculture. 550 , 737829
[Research article]

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Abstract

Many developing countries face challenges in managing food safety risks associated with consumption of animalsource foods. Efforts to address these challenges increasingly recognize the role of certification in agri-food systems governance. Understanding consumers' willingness to pay (WTP) for food safety certification is fundamental to determining the appropriate design and implementation of programs to reduce the burden of foodborne illnesses in developing countries. To address this need, we implemented a framed field experiment with consumers of eight farm-raised African Catfish (Clarias gariepinus) products varying in certification status (safety certified versus uncertified) and product forms (live versus smoked) to examine their WTP for food safety certification in Nigeria. We applied a mixed-effects model to account for the hierarchical structure of the data with one participant entering multiple bids, and estimated a model with participant fixed effects as a robustness check. We found that consumers were willing to pay between 3.1% and 18.8% more for fish certified as safe compared to uncertified fish. Furthermore, there was an asymmetry in food safety certification valuation, with consumers paying significant premiums for high-value larger-sized certified live and smoked catfish, but not smaller-sized certified live and smoked catfish. The results are robust to a specification in which consumer fixed effects are included. Our findings suggest there exists consumer demand for certification programs to upgrade the food safety standards of higher-value fish products in Nigeria's domestic markets. Lower-value fish products typically consumed by lower-income consumers show less potential for certification. Alternative safety regulation is needed to ensure safety practices for low-end fish products.

Authors/Creators:Tran, Nhuong and Shikuku, Kelvin and Hoffmann, Vivian and Lagerkvist, Carl-Johan and Pincus, Lauren and Akintola, Shehu Latunji and Fakoya, Kafayat Adetoun and Olagunju, Olanrewaju Femi and Bailey, Conner
Title:Are consumers in developing countries willing to pay for aquaculture food safety certification? Evidence from a field experiment in Nigeria
Series Name/Journal:Aquaculture
Year of publishing :2022
Volume:550
Article number:737829
Number of Pages:10
Publisher:ELSEVIER
ISSN:0044-8486
Language:English
Publication Type:Research article
Article category:Scientific peer reviewed
Version:Published version
Copyright:Creative Commons: Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0
Full Text Status:Public
Subjects:(A) Swedish standard research categories 2011 > 4 Agricultural Sciences > 401 Agricultural, Forestry and Fisheries > Fish and Aquacultural Science
(A) Swedish standard research categories 2011 > 5 Social Sciences > 502 Economics and Business > Economics
Keywords:Food safety, Aquatic food systems, Willingness to pay, Choice experiment, Certification, Nigeria
URN:NBN:urn:nbn:se:slu:epsilon-p-116663
Permanent URL:
http://urn.kb.se/resolve?urn=urn:nbn:se:slu:epsilon-p-116663
Additional ID:
Type of IDID
DOI10.1016/j.aquaculture.2021.737829
Web of Science (WoS)000771036200006
ID Code:27548
Faculty:NJ - Fakulteten för naturresurser och jordbruksvetenskap
Department:(NL, NJ) > Dept. of Economics
Deposited By: SLUpub Connector
Deposited On:13 Apr 2022 14:25
Metadata Last Modified:13 Apr 2022 14:31

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