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Wolf Responses to Experimental Human Approaches Using High-Resolution Positioning Data

Versluijs, Erik and Eriksen, Ane and Fuchs, Boris and Wikenros, Camilla and Sand, Håkan and Wabakken, Petter and Zimmermann, Barbara (2022). Wolf Responses to Experimental Human Approaches Using High-Resolution Positioning Data. Frontiers in Ecology and Evolution. 10 , 792916
[Research article]

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Abstract

Humans pose a major mortality risk to wolves. Hence, similar to how prey respond to predators, wolves can be expected to show anti-predator responses to humans. When exposed to a threat, animals may show a fight, flight, freeze or hide response. The type of response and the circumstances (e.g., distance and speed) at which the animal flees are useful parameters to describe the responses of wild animals to approaching humans. Increasing knowledge about behavioral responses of wolves toward humans might improve appropriate management and decrease conflicts related to fear of wolves. We did a pilot study by conducting 21 approach trials on seven GPS-collared wolves in four territories to investigate their responses to experimental human approaches. We found that wolves predominantly showed a flight response (N = 18), in a few cases the wolf did not flee (N = 3), but no wolves were seen or heard during trials. When wolves were downwind of the observer the flight initiation distance was significantly larger than when upwind, consistent with the hypothesis that conditions facilitating early detection would result in an earlier flight. Our hypothesis that early detection would result in less intense flights was not supported, as we found no correlation between flight initiation distances and speed, distance or straightness of the flight. Wolves in more concealed habitat had a shorter flight initiation distance or did not flee at all, suggesting that perceived risk might have been affected by horizontal visibility. Contrary to our expectation, resettling positions were less concealed (larger horizontal visibility) than the wolves' initial site. Although our small number of study animals and trials does not allow for generalizations, this pilot study illustrates how standardized human approach trials with high-resolution GPS-data can be used to describe wolf responses at a local scale. In continuation, this method can be applied at larger spatial scales to compare wolf flight responses within and between populations and across anthropogenic gradients, thus increasing the knowledge of wolf behavior toward humans, and potentially improving coexistence with wolves across their range.

Authors/Creators:Versluijs, Erik and Eriksen, Ane and Fuchs, Boris and Wikenros, Camilla and Sand, Håkan and Wabakken, Petter and Zimmermann, Barbara
Title:Wolf Responses to Experimental Human Approaches Using High-Resolution Positioning Data
Series Name/Journal:Frontiers in Ecology and Evolution
Year of publishing :2022
Volume:10
Article number:792916
Number of Pages:10
Publisher:FRONTIERS MEDIA SA
ISSN:2296-701X
Language:English
Publication Type:Research article
Article category:Scientific peer reviewed
Version:Published version
Copyright:Creative Commons: Attribution 4.0
Full Text Status:Public
Subjects:(A) Swedish standard research categories 2011 > 1 Natural sciences > 106 Biological Sciences (Medical to be 3 and Agricultural to be 4) > Ecology
Keywords:experimental human disturbances, flight responses, Canis lupus, animal behavior, flight initiation distance
URN:NBN:urn:nbn:se:slu:epsilon-p-117063
Permanent URL:
http://urn.kb.se/resolve?urn=urn:nbn:se:slu:epsilon-p-117063
Additional ID:
Type of IDID
DOI10.3389/fevo.2022.792916
Web of Science (WoS)000791359100001
ID Code:27797
Faculty:S - Faculty of Forest Sciences
Department:(NL, NJ) > Dept. of Ecology
(S) > Dept. of Ecology
Deposited By: SLUpub Connector
Deposited On:12 May 2022 16:26
Metadata Last Modified:12 May 2022 16:31

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