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Tradition as asset or burden for transitions from forests as cropping systems to multifunctional forest landscapes: Sweden as a case study

Angelstam, Per and Asplund, Brita and Bastian, Olaf and Engelmark, Ola and Fedoriak, Mariia and Grunewald, Karsten and Ibisch, Pierre L. and Manton, Michael and Nilsson, Magnus and Nilsson, Sten and Roberntz, Peter and Shkaruba, Anton and Skoog, Per and Soloviy, Ihor and Svoboda, Miroslav and Teplyakov, Victor and Tivell, Anders and Westholm, Erik and Zhuk, Alina and Öster, Leif (2022). Tradition as asset or burden for transitions from forests as cropping systems to multifunctional forest landscapes: Sweden as a case study. Forest Ecology and Management. 505 , 119895
[Research article]

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Abstract

Expectations of what forests and woodlands should provide vary among locations, stakeholder groups, and over time. Developing multifunctional forests requires understanding of the dynamic roles of traditions and cultural legacies in social-ecological systems at multiple levels and scales. Implementing policies about multifunctional forests requires a landscape and social-ecological perspective, and recognition of both spatial and temporal features at multiple scales. This study explores the dissemination of even-aged silviculture in central, eastern and northern Europe, and the consequences of choosing different vantage points in social-ecological systems for mapping of barriers, and to identify levers, towards multifunctional forest landscapes. Using a narrative approach, we first summarise the development of even-aged silviculture in four European regions. Next, we focus on Sweden as a keen adopter of even-aged silviculture, and identify levers at three groups of vantage points. They were (1) biosphere with biodiversity as short-hand for composition, structure and function of ecosystems, which support human well-being at multiple scales; (2) society in terms of different levels of stakeholder interactions from local to global, and (3) economy represented by value chain hierarchies and currencies. The emergence of even-aged silviculture >200 years ago formed an expanding frontier from central to northern Europe. Sustained yield wood production and biodiversity conservation encompass different portfolios of ecosystem aspects and spatio-temporal scales. Ignorance and lack of knowledge about these differences enforce their mutual rivalry. An exploratory review of six groups of stakeholders at multiple levels in the traditional industrial forest value chain highlights inequalities in terms of distribution of income and power across different levels of governance. This effectively marginalises other than powerful industrial actors. The distribution of financial results along the value chain is dynamic in space and time, and not all benefits of forest ecosystems can be measured using monetary valuation. There are also other currencies and incentives. A discussion of cultural trajectories in central and eastern European, Russian and Swedish forest management illustrates that forest history patterns repeat themselves. Longitudinal case studies of countries and regions can help foster holistic multi-dimensional and multilevel systems thinking. Application of deep levers of change is likely to require external drivers. A key challenge is to handle the manufacturing of doubt and decay of truth, i.e., the appearance of alternative facts, and the diminishing role of evidence and systems analyses in political and civic discourses. This transition is fuelled by new and rapidly evolving digital arenas.

Authors/Creators:Angelstam, Per and Asplund, Brita and Bastian, Olaf and Engelmark, Ola and Fedoriak, Mariia and Grunewald, Karsten and Ibisch, Pierre L. and Manton, Michael and Nilsson, Magnus and Nilsson, Sten and Roberntz, Peter and Shkaruba, Anton and Skoog, Per and Soloviy, Ihor and Svoboda, Miroslav and Teplyakov, Victor and Tivell, Anders and Westholm, Erik and Zhuk, Alina and Öster, Leif
Title:Tradition as asset or burden for transitions from forests as cropping systems to multifunctional forest landscapes: Sweden as a case study
Series Name/Journal:Forest Ecology and Management
Year of publishing :2022
Volume:505
Article number:119895
Number of Pages:17
Publisher:ELSEVIER
ISSN:0378-1127
Language:English
Publication Type:Research article
Article category:Scientific peer reviewed
Version:Published version
Copyright:Creative Commons: Attribution 4.0
Full Text Status:Public
Subjects:(A) Swedish standard research categories 2011 > 4 Agricultural Sciences > 401 Agricultural, Forestry and Fisheries > Forest Science
Keywords:Forest history, Collaborative learning, Honest broker, Landscape planning, Landscape stewardship, Systems-based thinking, Transformative change
URN:NBN:urn:nbn:se:slu:epsilon-p-116685
Permanent URL:
http://urn.kb.se/resolve?urn=urn:nbn:se:slu:epsilon-p-116685
Additional ID:
Type of IDID
DOI10.1016/j.foreco.2021.119895
Web of Science (WoS)000768891800004
ID Code:27804
Faculty:S - Faculty of Forest Sciences
NJ - Fakulteten för naturresurser och jordbruksvetenskap
Department:(S) > School for Forest Management
(NL, NJ) > Dept. of Urban and Rural Development
(LTJ, LTV) > Dept. of Urban and Rural Development
Deposited By: SLUpub Connector
Deposited On:13 May 2022 07:25
Metadata Last Modified:13 May 2022 07:31

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