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Risk and Reward in Foraging Migrations of North Pacific Albacore Determined From Estimates of Energy Intake and Movement Costs

Muhling, Barbara A. and Snyder, Stephanie and Hazen, Elliott L. and Whitlock, Rebecca and Dewar, Heidi and Park, Jong-Yeon and Stock, Charles A. and Block, Barbara A. (2022). Risk and Reward in Foraging Migrations of North Pacific Albacore Determined From Estimates of Energy Intake and Movement Costs. Frontiers in marine science. 9 , 730428
[Research article]

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Abstract

North Pacific albacore (Thunnus alalunga) is a commercially important tuna species known to undertake extensive migratory movements between nearshore waters of the California Current and offshore environments in the central Pacific. However, these migration behaviors are highly variable, with some individuals traveling thousands of kilometers within a season, and others largely resident in the southern California Current throughout the year. In this study, we use data from 33 archival-tagged albacore (released between 2003 and 2011) to examine the movements, physiology and ecology of tuna following different migratory pathways. We used direct measurements of body temperature and ambient water temperature from internal archival tags to estimate energy intake via the Heat Increment of Feeding (HIF), the increased internal heat production associated with digestion of a meal. Our results indicate that HIF was variable in space and time, but it was highest for individuals foraging in the offshore North Pacific Transition Zone and southern California Current during spring and summer, and lowest in the Transition Zone in fall. None of the migratory strategies examined appeared to confer consistently higher energetic benefits than the others. Fish remaining resident in the southern California Current year-round incurred lower migration costs, and could access favorable foraging conditions off Baja California in spring and summer. In contrast, fish which undertook longer migrations had much higher energetic costs during periods of faster transit times, but were able to reach highly productive foraging areas in the central and western Pacific. HIF was generally higher in larger fish, and when ambient temperatures were cooler, but was not strongly correlated with other environmental covariates. Our analyses offer new avenues for studying the physiology of wild tuna populations, and can complement diet and isotopic studies to further understanding of fish ecology.

Authors/Creators:Muhling, Barbara A. and Snyder, Stephanie and Hazen, Elliott L. and Whitlock, Rebecca and Dewar, Heidi and Park, Jong-Yeon and Stock, Charles A. and Block, Barbara A.
Title:Risk and Reward in Foraging Migrations of North Pacific Albacore Determined From Estimates of Energy Intake and Movement Costs
Series Name/Journal:Frontiers in marine science
Year of publishing :2022
Volume:9
Article number:730428
Number of Pages:17
Publisher:FRONTIERS MEDIA SA
ISSN:2296-7745
Language:English
Publication Type:Research article
Article category:Scientific peer reviewed
Version:Published version
Copyright:Creative Commons: Attribution 4.0
Full Text Status:Public
Subjects:(A) Swedish standard research categories 2011 > 4 Agricultural Sciences > 401 Agricultural, Forestry and Fisheries > Fish and Aquacultural Science
Keywords:North Pacific albacore, foraging ecology, highly migratory species, tuna migration, heat increment of feeding
URN:NBN:urn:nbn:se:slu:epsilon-p-117089
Permanent URL:
http://urn.kb.se/resolve?urn=urn:nbn:se:slu:epsilon-p-117089
Additional ID:
Type of IDID
DOI10.3389/fmars.2022.730428
Web of Science (WoS)000787555600001
ID Code:27950
Faculty:NJ - Fakulteten för naturresurser och jordbruksvetenskap
Department:(NL, NJ) > Department of Aquatic Resources
Deposited By: SLUpub Connector
Deposited On:18 May 2022 14:28
Metadata Last Modified:18 May 2022 14:31

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