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Inhibition of predator attraction to kairomones by non-host plant volatiles for herbivores: a bypass-trophic signal

Zhang, QingHe and Schlyter, Fredrik (2010). Inhibition of predator attraction to kairomones by non-host plant volatiles for herbivores: a bypass-trophic signal. PloS one. 5:6, 1-9
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Official URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0011063

Abstract

Background Insect predators and parasitoids exploit attractive chemical signals from lower trophic levels as kairomones to locate their herbivore prey and hosts. We hypothesized that specific chemical cues from prey non-hosts and non-habitats, which are not part of the trophic chain, are also recognized by predators and would inhibit attraction to the host/prey kairomone signals. To test our hypothesis, we studied the olfactory physiology and behavior of a predaceous beetle, Thanasimus formicarius (L.) (Coleoptera: Cleridae), in relation to specific angiosperm plant volatiles, which are non-host volatiles (NHV) for its conifer-feeding bark beetle prey. Methodology/Principal Findings Olfactory detection in the clerid was confirmed by gas chromatography coupled to electroantennographic detection (GC-EAD) for a subset of NHV components. Among NHV, we identified two strongly antennally active molecules, 3-octanol and 1-octen-3-ol. We tested the potential inhibition of the combination of these two NHV on the walking and flight responses of the clerid to known kairomonal attractants such as synthetic mixtures of bark beetle (Ips spp.) aggregation pheromone components (cis-verbenol, ipsdienol, and E-myrcenol) combined with conifer (Picea and Pinus spp.) monoterpenes (α-pinene, terpinolene, and Δ3-carene). There was a strong inhibitory effect, both in the laboratory (effect size d = −3.2, walking bioassay) and in the field (d = −1.0, flight trapping). This is the first report of combining antennal detection (GC-EAD) and behavioral responses to identify semiochemical molecules that bypass the trophic system, signaling habitat information rather than food related information. Conclusions/Significance Our results, along with recent reports on hymenopteran parasitoids and coleopteran predators, suggest that some NHV chemicals for herbivores are part of specific behavioral signals for the higher trophic level and not part of a background noise. Such bypass-trophic signals could be of general importance for third trophic level players in avoiding unsuitable habitats with non-host plants of their prey.

Authors/Creators:Zhang, QingHe and Schlyter, Fredrik
Title:Inhibition of predator attraction to kairomones by non-host plant volatiles for herbivores: a bypass-trophic signal
Series/Journal:PloS one (11446107)
Year of publishing :June 2010
Volume:5
Number:6
Page range:1-9
Publisher:Public Library of Science
Language:English
Additional Information:© 2010 Zhang, Schlyter. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.
Publication Type:Journal article
Refereed:Yes
Full Text Status:Public
Subjects:Obsolete subject words > FORESTRY, AGRICULTURAL SCIENCES and LANDSCAPE PLANNING > Plant production > Plant and forest protection
Keywords:Thanasimus formicarius (L.) (Coleoptera: Cleridae), Insect predators , Parasitoids, Olfactory physiology , Olfaction, Checkered beetle, European conifer bark beetles
URN:NBN:urn:nbn:se:slu:epsilon-4-335
Permanent URL:
http://urn.kb.se/resolve?urn=urn:nbn:se:slu:epsilon-4-335
ID Code:5457
Department:(LTJ, LTV) > Department of Plant Protection Biology
Deposited By: Jenny Casey Eriksson
Deposited On:18 Oct 2010 00:00
Metadata Last Modified:02 Dec 2014 10:40

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