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Odorant receptor phylogeny confirms conserved channels for sex pheromone and host plant signals in tortricid moths

Gonzalez, Francisco and Borrero-Echeverry, Felipe and Josvai, Julia K. and Strandh, Maria and Unelius, C. Rikard and Toth, Miklos and Witzgall, Peter and Bengtsson, Marie and Walker, William B. (2020). Odorant receptor phylogeny confirms conserved channels for sex pheromone and host plant signals in tortricid moths. Ecology and Evolution. 10
[Journal article]

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Abstract

The search for mates and food is mediated by volatile chemicals. Insects sense food odorants and sex pheromones through odorant receptors (ORs) and pheromone receptors (PRs), which are expressed in olfactory sensory neurons. Molecular phylogenetics of ORs, informed by behavioral and functional data, generates sound hypotheses for the identification of semiochemicals driving olfactory behavior. Studying orthologous receptors and their ligands across taxa affords insights into the role of chemical communication in reproductive isolation and phylogenetic divergence. The female sex pheromone of green budworm mothHedya nubiferana(Lepidoptera, Totricidae) is a blend of two unsaturated acetates, only a blend of both elicits male attraction. Females produce in addition codlemone, which is the sex pheromone of another tortricid, codling mothCydia pomonella. Codlemone also attracts green budworm moth males. Concomitantly, green budworm and codling moth males are attracted to the host plant volatile pear ester. A congruent behavioral response to the same pheromone and plant volatile in two tortricid species suggests co-occurrence of dedicated olfactory channels. In codling moth, one PR is tuned to both compounds, the sex pheromone codlemone and the plant volatile pear ester. Our phylogenetic analysis finds that green budworm moth expresses an orthologous PR gene. Shared ancestry, and high levels of amino acid identity and sequence similarity, in codling and green budworm moth PRs offer an explanation for parallel attraction of both species to the same compounds. A conserved olfactory channel for a sex pheromone and a host plant volatile substantiates the alliance of social and habitat signals in insect chemical communication. Field attraction assays confirm that in silico investigations of ORs afford powerful predictions for an efficient identification of behavior-modifying semiochemicals, for an improved understanding of the mechanisms of host plant attraction in insect herbivores and for the further development of sustainable insect control.

Authors/Creators:Gonzalez, Francisco and Borrero-Echeverry, Felipe and Josvai, Julia K. and Strandh, Maria and Unelius, C. Rikard and Toth, Miklos and Witzgall, Peter and Bengtsson, Marie and Walker, William B.
Title:Odorant receptor phylogeny confirms conserved channels for sex pheromone and host plant signals in tortricid moths
Series Name/Journal:Ecology and Evolution
Year of publishing :2020
Volume:10
Number of Pages:15
Publisher:WILEY
ISSN:2045-7758
Language:English
Publication Type:Journal article
Article category:Scientific peer reviewed
Version:Published version
Copyright:Creative Commons: Attribution 4.0
Full Text Status:Public
Subjects:(A) Swedish standard research categories 2011 > 1 Natural sciences > 106 Biological Sciences (Medical to be 3 and Agricultural to be 4) > Ecology
Keywords:behavior-modifying chemicals, kairomone, Lepidoptera, olfaction, reproductive behavior, semiochemical, sustainable insect control, Tortricidae
URN:NBN:urn:nbn:se:slu:epsilon-p-107037
Permanent URL:
http://urn.kb.se/resolve?urn=urn:nbn:se:slu:epsilon-p-107037
Additional ID:
Type of IDID
DOI10.1002/ece3.6458
Web of Science (WoS)000548004000001
ID Code:22417
Faculty:LTV - Fakulteten för landskapsarkitektur, trädgårds- och växtproduktionsvetenskap
Department:(LTJ, LTV) > Department of Plant Protection Biology
Deposited By: SLUpub Connector
Deposited On:17 Feb 2021 12:23
Metadata Last Modified:17 Feb 2021 12:31

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