Home About Browse Search
Svenska


Capturing indirect genetic effects on phenotypic variability: Competition meets canalization

Marjanovic, Jovana and Mulder, Han A. and Rönnegård, Lars and De Koning, Dirk-Jan and Bijma, Piter (2022). Capturing indirect genetic effects on phenotypic variability: Competition meets canalization. Evolutionary applications. 15 :4 , 694-705
[Research article]

[img] PDF
1MB

Abstract

Phenotypic variability of a genotype is relevant both in natural and domestic populations. In the past two decades, variability has been studied as a heritable quantitative genetic trait in its own right, often referred to as inherited variability or environmental canalization. So far, studies on inherited variability have only considered genetic effects of the focal individual, that is, direct genetic effects on inherited variability. Observations from aquaculture populations and some plants, however, suggest that an additional source of genetic variation in inherited variability may be generated through competition. Social interactions, such as competition, are often a source of Indirect Genetic Effects (IGE). An IGE is a heritable effect of an individual on the trait value of another individual. IGEs may substantially affect heritable variation underlying the trait, and the direction and magnitude of response to selection. To understand the contribution of IGEs to evolution of environmental canalization in natural populations, and to exploit such inherited variability in animal and plant breeding, we need statistical models to capture this effect. To our knowledge, it is unknown to what extent the current statistical models commonly used for IGE and inherited variability capture the effect of competition on inherited variability. Here, we investigate the potential of current statistical models for inherited variability and trait values, to capture the direct and indirect genetic effects of competition on variability. Our results show that a direct model of inherited variability almost entirely captures the genetic sensitivity of individuals to competition, whereas an indirect model of inherited variability captures the cooperative genetic effects of individuals on their partners. Models for trait levels, however, capture only a small part of the genetic effects of competition. The estimation of direct and indirect genetic effects of competition, therefore, is possible with models for inherited variability but may require a two-step analysis.

Authors/Creators:Marjanovic, Jovana and Mulder, Han A. and Rönnegård, Lars and De Koning, Dirk-Jan and Bijma, Piter
Title:Capturing indirect genetic effects on phenotypic variability: Competition meets canalization
Series Name/Journal:Evolutionary applications
Year of publishing :2022
Volume:15
Number:4
Page range:694-705
Number of Pages:12
Publisher:WILEY
ISSN:1752-4571
Language:English
Publication Type:Research article
Article category:Scientific peer reviewed
Version:Published version
Copyright:Creative Commons: Attribution 4.0
Full Text Status:Public
Subjects:(A) Swedish standard research categories 2011 > 1 Natural sciences > 106 Biological Sciences (Medical to be 3 and Agricultural to be 4) > Evolutionary Biology
Keywords:canalization, competition, IGE, indirect genetic effects, inherited variability, statistical models
URN:NBN:urn:nbn:se:slu:epsilon-p-116466
Permanent URL:
http://urn.kb.se/resolve?urn=urn:nbn:se:slu:epsilon-p-116466
Additional ID:
Type of IDID
DOI10.1111/eva.13353
Web of Science (WoS)000765749600001
Scopus2-s2.0-85126020494
ID Code:27976
Faculty:VH - Faculty of Veterinary Medicine and Animal Science
Department:(VH) > Dept. of Animal Breeding and Genetics
Deposited By: SLUpub Connector
Deposited On:23 May 2022 13:25
Metadata Last Modified:23 May 2022 13:31

Repository Staff Only: item control page

Downloads

Downloads per year (since September 2012)

View more statistics

Downloads
Hits